Best CSGO Betting Sites - Bet on Skins, Matches and Worlds

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Which one is the best CS:GO betting site?

I'm looking for a good betting site, but I do not know what to look for. I have found this list http://www.csgolist.com/en/betting/ and it seems to be quite good. but which site think you guys are the best?
submitted by SignedByDC to GlobalOffensive [link] [comments]

THE BEST CS:GO BETTING SITE EVER (posting 7/25/2016)

THE BEST CS:GO BETTING SITE EVER (posting 7/25/2016) submitted by QuikSilver02 to YoutubersCSGO [link] [comments]

Best CSGO Betting Sites – Top CS:GO Gambling Websites List

Best CSGO Betting Sites – Top CS:GO Gambling Websites List submitted by GeorgeKCochran to esportsbettingarea [link] [comments]

The best CS:GO gambling sites in 2020: Legit places to bet

The best CS:GO gambling sites in 2020: Legit places to bet submitted by 0zarm to luckbox [link] [comments]

You're converting your CS:GO sensitivity wrong, here is why.

You're converting your CS:GO sensitivity wrong, here is why.
UPDATED: This new FOV method is the ONLY way to achieve a near-perfect 1:1 conversion between both games, providing you are willing to loose (or gain in some situations) a little bit of screen real-estate. This will match your games' FOVs in terms of screen distances by taking advantage of Valorant's locked FOV. This is now my preferred method, and I'll leave it at the top. I've left the old post below if anyone can't handle loosing some screen real-estate. In the following few paragraphs, most use-cases are covered.
I will create a set of custom resolutions to run Valorant at below. These should all be scaled 1:1 by your video card on your monitor (No Scaling, aka, no pixel stretching). If you have stretched CSGO, you are screwed, see the next paragraph. 4:3 non-streched users can rejoice, as can 16:9 users. 16:10 users can't use the FOV method, but get a reasonable multiplier, and aren't entirely screwed, but its not as good news as the 16:9 and 4:3 non-stretched users who get heaps of options.
For non-streched users, these will all use the standard 3.18 divider for your CSGO sensitivity, as we have matched FOV, and we can happily match 360 rotations AND achieve perfect on-screen distance for aim. If you don't want to have any black bars on the horizontal, just match the vertical resolution to the same as CSGO. I believe this will give you some vertical sensitivity error though (eg: instead of using 3622x2038 in Valorant in the first example in the resolution list below, I could just use 3622x2160 and accept some vertical error, but only take on side black bars, with no top and bottom black bars. Valorant will look a little more distorted though too). If you can't figure it out with other weirder CSGO configs, feel free to request, and I can give it a go, but I have already spent a lot of time on this and would rather let people start reporting them in. If you really can't figure it out, ask and let me know.
STRETCH USER: Note to users who take a CSGO 4:3 native ratio/resolution and stretch it out to fill a 16:9 or 16:10 monitor: TLDR: Stretched CSGO users are screwed. Nothing can be done, and as I said near the bottom of my original post, this is your punishment for sweating over fat terrorists your whole life.
It is IMPOSSIBLE to salvage the same FOV in valorant. You have an hFOV of 90 in CS, stretched out to take up your whole screen real-estate. You need to somehow get Valorant's hFOV from 103 down to 90. You can't. You would have to somehow superscale the game past the edge of your monitor, and clip its wings, loosing much of your HUD, and I also have no idea how you could even render it like that. For these users, either use the original 3.18 value, or 2.53 if you want your horizontal distance to match. See my footnote for stretched users way below (2.53 will FUBAR your vertical sens for Valorant, and give you radically wrong 360 motion.). There is no ideal solution for stretch CS users. For most stretch users, I would recommend the 3.18 value as a starting point and learning the new sensitivity. Any data I presented was based on Non stretch conversions. Stretch conversions has the same kind of error gradient that emerges, but radically worse.

CUSTOM RESOLUTIONS FOR VALORANT TO MAINTAIN A 1:1 FOV CONVERSION WITH CSGO:
CSGO NOT STRETCHED, 1:1 implies pixel perfect scaling. Pixel doubling would also be ok (using resolutions half the amount of your monitors native). If you are not 1:1, or 2:1 with pixels, it might still work as long as the ratios are the same, depending on how your graphics card behaves. Not listed below? If your CSGO VERTICAL resolution is listed below, then pick any one that has the same vertical res as you, regardless of horizontal, and find the valorant conversion. They all become the same, because csgo just clips your horizontal anyway.

Simple formula!!!:
Take your csgo vertical resolution (the 1080 in 1920x1080 for example):

Times by 0.9428793 = new Valorant horizontal res
Times by 1.67622932 = new Valorant vertical res

Thank you to x_Delirium in this following post for the math (I adapted his math to figure out the vertical constant without needing to use mouse-sensitivity.com):
https://www.reddit.com/VALORANT/comments/fw5nb9/guide_how_to_get_valorant_103_fov_in_csgo/

Common list already done for you, rounded to nearest whole and even numbers:
CSGO: 3840×2160 1:1 16:9 -> Valorant: 3620x2036 1:1
CSGO: 2880x2160 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant: 3620x2036 1:1
CSGO: 2560x1440 1:1 16:9 -> Valorant: 2414x1358 1:1
CSGO: 1920x1440 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant: 2414x1358 1:1
CSGO: 1920x1080 1:1 16:9 -> Valorant: 1810x1018 1:1 **\*
CSGO: 1440x1080 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant: 1810x1018 1:1 **\*
CSGO: 1366x1080 1:1 ??? -> Valorant: 1810x1018 1:1 **\*
CSGO: 1280x960 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant: 1610x906 1:1
CSGO: 1024x768 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant: 1288x724 1:1
CSGO: 1280x720 1:1 16:9 -> Valorant 1206x678 1:1
CSGO: 960x720 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant 1206x678 1:1
CSGO: 640x480 1:1 4:3 -> Valorant 804x452 1:1

**\* See how if you use a blackbar res that isn't 4:3, you can get 1:1 with valorant by finding a res above that matches your csgo VERTICAL res, here, that res is 1080.

A decent guide for custom rez creation:
https://appuals.com/how-to-create-custom-resolutions-on-windows-7-8-or-10/

16:10 Native USERS
CSGO: Any 1:1 16:10 NATIVE Resolution -> Valorant IMPOSSIBLE. You only have 100.39 degrees of FOV in CSGO, and you have no more monitor horizontal space to work with to give Valorant room to breathe. It is the same fundamental problem the stretch users are facing. If you use 16:10 on a monitor natively, but somehow have horizontal black bars (this would be weird and unlikely) then it might be possible to do something. For 16:10 users, your best bet is to just use 3.18 or 3.037 (based on my original post's logic) as your sens divider, and see what you prefer, or use something in between. Fortunately for you, 3.037 is a decent multiplier that won't fuck your vertical sense, or 360 too badly. It is pretty much as good as the 3.370 multiplier that 16:9 users who don't want to match FOV can use.

16:9 USERS NOT WILLING TO CHANGE THEIR SCREEN REAL-ESTATE TO MATCH FOV
The divider value I originally posed as being better than 3.18: 3.370
Not everyone will agree, no problem. Consider 3.18 to 3.37 as the sensitivity region you may like. If you pick one, and something feels wrong, try the other. Yes, my original claim about 3.18 being the downright wrong choice is alarmist. Some people will reasonably prefer one or the other, and there are merits to both choices, as I pointed out all along.

Now back to the ideal FOV changing method, and how this ideal FOV matching method works:
CSGO maintains a variable horizontal FOV depending on resolution ratio width, and at 16:9, it is 106.260205, and maintains 73.739795 vertical FOV, LOCKED. At more boxed resolutions/ratios, the sides get sliced off, and you loose hFOV. You never lose vFOV
Valorant maintains a tight 103 horizontal FOV, and ~ 70.5328 vertical FOV. BOTH locked. I've tested this in game by wildly changing ratios and custom resolutions. The game image will always distort to maintain the H and V FOV. We can use this to our advantage to distort Valorant into a screen space that matches what those angles and distances would be in CSGO. Valorant is basically just a slightly zoomed in image compared to CSGO, so now we are going to zoom it out on our monitor a bit to match it.
I originally did some incorrect math to convert this (didn't use trig...). There is a simpler way using the mouse-sensitivity website. I'll run through what I did for my screen (2560x1440). This should be correct providing the mouse-sensitivity equations are correct behind the scene, and I do trust that they are. (This is redundant now. I used the trig to get the constants. See near the res list to the easiest method possible).
Select CSGO as your game. Set sens and DPI. Set res to 2560x1440 (or your native res of CSGO). Start to adjust the 2560 number until it closes in on 103 degrees actual hFOV at the data readout. 2414 pixels is the spot... We just found out what our horizontal res needs to be for valorant (with some small black bars) to match perfectly to csgo, seeming valorant will lock at 103 hFOV no matter what.
You could stop there, and it would be pretty good. Horizontal aim and 360 degree matching is now near pixel perfect. I haven't proven this, but I believe your vertical aim will still be off though. So let's do the same for vertical matching:
Now, convert to Valorant as the output. Set the above horizontal res number just found (2416) as your Valorant res. Now adjust the Valorant vertical res number, until Actual vFOV output closes in on 70.5328. This is taking advantage of what I believe is actually a bug on the Valorant data on the website: it thinks valorant's vFOV can change, even though it can't, so we can use it to figure out what pixel count will salvage our smaller vFOV with black bars. I believe for me, 1358 is that number. If they fix this, we will loose the ability to easily match this using the website (redundant now, we can just use the trig derived constants instead of the website. See above the Res list). Redundant: However, it will still be possible to do by matching it until the vertical distance based sensitivities are the same as the 360 degree rotation sensitivities, but it won't be quite as precise or easy, and will require payment on the site. It is plausible that the vertical component of this is slightly off, but I can't see how or why, and if it is, it would be a tiny deviation. If anyone wants to do the math manually to check, please do.
We now have a new resolution 2414x1358. Set this with NVIDIA control panel, (or AMD, not familiar with it though) as a custom res, and use it in valorant.
Divide your csgo sens by 3.18, or use the default (and free) 360 match on the website (it is doing the same division, just more decimals), and use that.
Set scope multiplier to 0.747, or set/leave to preference (see closer to bottom of my original post far below). I still use 0.747.
A near perfect 1:1 experience between both games is now achieved within a tiny and imperceptible margin of error. All we have done is matched Valorant to fill 103 degrees of CSGO's 106.26xxx screen real-estate on the horizontal (talking from a 16:9 perspective), and 70.5328 degrees of CSGOs 73.73xxx on the vertical.
You may have lost about 11% of your screen real-estate. Effectively, it is like playing CSGO with a little bit of the top, bottom and sides of your screen sheered off. The benefit is a near perfect match in horizontal and vertical behaviour at both the aimer, all the way through to 360 degree movement, a 1:1 match. If you just do the black bars at the sides, your vertical sensitivity will be the same as when using the 360 method, so slightly off, but you've salvaged your horizontal sens completely. Add the vertical black bars, and it should be perfect all-round. If you use a 4:3 CSGO native resolution, you will GAIN screen real-estate in order to match FOV.
A few notes. This does NOT significantly distort Valorant from a native 16:9 (providing you are coming from 16:9 CSGO). Things look absolutely fine. You will almost certainly need to run on Fullscreen mode for it to function well. Windowed mode would work too, but leave your desktop in the wings. Fullscreen Windowed doesn't work for me, it just stretches it back out to full screen.
Are there any negatives to the FOV method in terms of perception and aim? Well, your perception may hinge somewhat on the moving region of the screen being identical in both games. However, I think it most likely that matching FOV, and distances on your monitor, sitting roughly equidistant at all times, and having everything else perfect, will be by far the most successful method for the vast majority of users transitioning between games. I personally have also clipped CSGO now to give it 103 FOV on the horizontal instead of 106.26 (giving me the same vertical black bars between both games) for the utmost consistency. So the only difference between the two games is Valorant has some horizontal black bars. Doing this of course didn't impact my sensitivity in CSGO at all, it just clips the image at the sides a little, giving me some black bars. Remember, CSGO's horizontal FOV is variable based on resolution.
My CSGO res: 2416x1440 native black bar ~ 103x73 FOV blackbars on sides
My valorant res: 2416x1358 ~ 103x70 FOV blackbars on sides, top and bottom.
Hopefully that makes sense.


If you refuse to loose a bit of screen real estate, this is my original post below which uses a different divider that prioritises screen distance instead of 360 degree rotation as the method of matching sensitivities between both games. Both my number below, and the original 3.18 number (without doing what I propose above) will have significant errors, in different parts of your aiming. I argue that my number is better if you want to match your aim. It won't feel right for everyone, and some still preferred 3.18, which is perfectly reasonable. I personally now will be using my above method of matching FOV for a 1:1 match, making this entire section obsolete.

THE ORIGINAL POST WITH THE ORIGINAL VALUES THAT CAN RECOVER SOME OF YOUR AIM IF IT WAS FEELING OFF, FOR THOSE NOT WILLING TO LOOSE SOME SCREEN REAL-ESTATE:

IMPORTANT EDIT: This new number can change depending on your game window ratio. If you are not using the simple 16:9 to 16:9 conversion, proceed with caution. This is largely, although not just, due to how valorant distorts to maintain its 103 hFOV. However, it should be ok if neither game is distorted. So black bars 4:3 CS is ok, as long as valorant is 16:9. I encourage you to head to mouse-sensitivity.com to get a more reliable value using 0% horizontal distance as your match if there is any deviation from these norms. It will cost $3. To anyone I recommended a value to NOT using 16:9, it may be wrong. Apologies. I have a caveat about stretch to non-stretch conversions in a footnote you need to be aware of if deploying this.
TLDR:
The normal method is to divide your CSGO sens by 3.18. This doesn't actually give you correct aim, only a correct abstract sense of movement in the world. Divide by the below instead:
16:9 CSGO to 16:9 Valorant (Native to native): 3.370 ​
4:3 CSGO blackbar non-streched to 16:9 Valorant: 3.370
4:3 CSGO STRETCHED to 16:9 Valorant (Don't fuck with valorant here, it won't behave how you hope): 2.53
PEOPLE USING STRETCHED CONVERSIONS, SEE THE FOOTNOTE BEFORE ASKING QUESTIONS PLEASE :) TLDR IS THAT ALL OPTIONS SUCK AND YOU REALLY MAY WANT TO JUST STICK WITH 3.18.

Ideal, and common scope multipliers are given at the bottom in the scope footnote. For any other weird options, again, pay and go do the work at mouse-sensitivity.com

Yes, using 3.370 will 'feel' a little slower to get around in Valorant now compared to 3.18, at worst about 6% slower in fact, but your aim is more likely to be left in tact. Use whatever you prefer though. Just giving people another option and some stats to what the difference is.

Keep reading if you want to know why these proposed conversions (really just the 3.370 one) are technically "better" than 3.18: This is the bulk of my original post:

ORIGINAL POST AND PROOFING:
People are under the impression that they should be converting their sensitivity from CS:GO by dividing their CS:GO sensitivity by 3.18...
People think this will give them the same sensitivity, thus muscle memory, between the games.
They are (kind of) wrong.
This will only give you the same sense of traversing the game world, as it matches the amount of distance required to move your mouse for a 360 degree rotation. BUT, due to the FOV difference between the two games of 3.26 degrees, you will not have the same feeling of SENSITIVITY.
Here is the result of some math as to why.
How far do I have to move my mouse, in order to get from where my crosshair is, to where that enemies head is on my screen?
You can only achieve a perfect conversion between the two games at ONE point on your monitor. ONE distance. And I can tell you, the 360 degree rotation conversion is wildly off, unless you intend to do a few rotations first in order to hit someone in the head.
I ran the math, and the correct point to calibrate to on your screen is almost certainly 0%, right at the crosshair, making subtle movements at the crosshair (in order to target enemies near your crosshair) perfect between both games. Many may already be aware of this, but it is interesting to understand why.
Ok, if we use the 0% conversion, we end up with a 1:1 SENSITIVITY match between CS:GO and Valorant AT THE CROSSHAIR. Great, but what about points AWAY from the middle of my screen? Well, things gradually get worse the further the distance, and I will provide the percentage of deviation from a perfect match between the special 0% mark, and the very edge of your monitor, if you set at this 0% mark, and I include the error in doing a 360 too.

%distance from edge of screen to crosshair with 0% reference: % error in ideal conversion from CSGO at 0% reference
What do we notice? Perfect conversion (within a few units of error not shown) within a full 15% distance from crosshair to edge of your screen. And very low error, less than 1%, all the way up to 50% distance to edge of screen. This is the hot spot region of aiming. If you are flicking to the VERY edge of your screen, 100% of the way, you have a 2.89% error. Achieving a 360 degree rotation has a 6.02% error, so moving around the game world will feel a bit slower compared to CS:GO, but your aim is comparatively left in tact. A 180 will have about a 5.78% error according to my best calculations.
To compare, lets check the error at each aiming location using the 360 degree as our baseline, the common method where one divides their CS:GO sens by 3.18...

%distance from edge of screen to crosshair at 360 rotation reference: % error in ideal conversion from CSGO 360 rotation reference
We can see, our 0% distance from edge of screen naturally carries the most error with this method. The aiming hotspot is the WORST translated region. Only a 360 spin is well conserved, NOT your aim. Even aiming to the edge of the screen at 100% carries a (slightly) higher error of 2.95 compared to matching your aim to the 0% mark (2.89% error). At 120% distance from your crosshair (heading offscreen by 20%) the methods switch place, and the 360 degree method becomes less error prone compared to 0% matching.
So, unless you intend your muscle memory to be all about matching for flicking to targets OFFSCREEN, you should absolutely NOT be using the default division by 3.181818....
Match instead to 0%, and divide your CS:GO sensitivity by 3.370 (This is accurate to +- 0.001 units of Valorant sensitivity). This will give you a cleaner conversion in the region of your monitor from 0% to about 115% off your screen, with the MOST conserved sensitivity region being closest to your crosshair.
What is better... for your near-crosshair aiming to carry a 5.68% error? Or a 180 spin to carry about the same amount of error while your key crosshair region carries between none to 1% error. You get the latter with the division I provided above. It seems to me a no-brainer as the better option.

SCOPE FOOTNOTE:

As for your scope multiplier? Unfortunately, at this time you can only correct for one zoom level. I use the 2.5x zoom, to correct the scopes to the same 0% level of my valorant sensitivity, and if you correct as I have said, using the superior 0% CSGO conversion, you will also end up with your scopes behaving the same between CS:GO and valorant. Otherwise, they too will carry the error over from the 360 degree conversion. These values are below (assuming you use 3.370 as your division initially, things get wonky if you want to keep to your 360 degree rotation conservation, yet want your scopes to somehow match). These are independent of your sens.
I think the default of 1.0 in Valorant is equivalent to calibrating all of them to the edge of your screen, 100% by distance. This is, at least, a consistent behaviour. I personally still change it to 0.747.

SCOPE:
To correct the 2.5x valorant scope: 0.747
This = ~ 0.82 from CSGO. Specifically 0.818933

A note about scope multipliers: The ideal provided above is for matching your scope movement to distance via the exact same logic as presented for matching the two games, at 0% distance.
A few other common scope mulits that people like:
CSGO 1.2 = 1.142 Valorant
CSGO 1.0 = 0.927 Valorant

ALL these values are dependent on using 3.370 as your primary sensitivity divider, and not 3.18. Otherwise, your scopes will carry the error of the primary sens. If using different stretched values, these scoped values should still work ON THE HORIZON. Remember, stretched conversions cook your vertical sensitivity, and you can't do anything about it.

Hopefully Valorant releases the ability to tune every scope/ADS level individually, because right now, every other ADS will be a bit off compared to the ideal 2.5x scope. But still closer than the default 1.0 value. For example, the 1.25x ADS of the vandal etc should be set to 0.870, and will be a bit slow with the 0.747 setting.
Yes, scope values can, although not always, change if you deviate from the default 16:9 to 16:9.

STRETCHED GO TO VALORANT FOOTNOTE (or vice versa, non-stretched to stretched):
Converting from stretched to any Valorant can COOK your vertical sens. Nothing can be done, this is your punishment for sweating over fat terrorists your whole life. The divider for 4:3 stretched to Valorant is generically 2.53. Any divider that deviates from 3.18 will increasingly add error to your 360 degree movement. This means that the with a stretch value you end up with a much greater error ramp through the distances, even though your 0% and nearby is correct. I don't have the percentages of error, and I can't be bothered running them, but expect it to be awful. Not to mention, you can't salvage horizontal AND vertical sens anyway with thiscombination, so it still won't feel right. My recommendation for these users is to match to the 360 or nearby (divide by 3.18), tune to personal preference, and learn the new sensitivity, sorry.

If you are doing more bizarre conversions, go pay $3 and figure it out at mouse-sensitivity.com using 0% horizontal monitor distance as your hipfire conversion method. Or tune to 3.18 manually, because just like the above, you can't salvage your old sensitivity with varying stretch conversions to any point that won't feel awful on the vertical and 360 movements.
BETTER DATA:
For the data folk, this much more complete and accurate set of data will give you the error to each point of the screen given a calibration at a specific point. You'll notice at the bottom, all multipliers to use said distance is provided. You'll notice I've used actually the 15% distance as the default, this is because it is a simpler number (3.37) and it actually will give you, almost 100% of the time, the exact same sensitivity as 0% anyway (3.374). However, if you want to have minimum error across the whole visible space, then you actually want to use 50% as your target point (3.334) BUT the error around the crosshair, at 0-15%, is no longer negligible, even though, in reality, across the whole screen, you could consider this the best choice. Sum of the error is of course absolute values. 360 Rot is provided for comparison of error in these regions against the default 3.18(2) method.

https://preview.redd.it/z9yz28m5nm451.png?width=602&format=png&auto=webp&s=5e8e88596e7c77faae03c7caf112deef96b0605f
DISCLAIMER:
I made extensive use of the mouse-sensitivity.com website for gathering all data points involved in these calculations. I did not do any of the math to generate those data points myself, just the analysis. Check them out, and consider giving them some cash if any of this ended up making things better for you. It's a great site.
submitted by binkaaa to VALORANT [link] [comments]

Aspects of Game Awareness in Competitive Counter Strike

I wrote this for my friends who are either stuck in lower skill groups or are relatively new to the game and have low amount of experience in counter strike. Just thought I will share it on this sub-reddit too, in case it might help someone. This is my personal opinion based on thousands of hours playing and learning about this game from as many good resources as possible. I reached supreme as my highest rank in soloq for what its worth (not much) and I don't claim to be an expert so feel free to correct me, if I may be mistaken about something. Overall I feel these are the the very fundamental non-mechanical aspects of the game that lower ranks and newer players struggle with the most. Hope it helps someone. Thanks
Know the difference between team deathmatch and counter strike. The objective in deathmatch is to kill as many people as possible and avoid getting killed as much as possible. The objective in counter strike is to plant the bomb and defend it from getting defused as T. As ct your objective is to stop the bomb from getting planted and defusing it in time, if it does get planted. In counter strike "kills" are only a means to an end, not an end in itself. In other words, kills are beneficial if they help you to achieve your objective. In most other cases, they are meaningless. The game will reward your team with a point if you successfully complete the objective, it is blind to everything else that is happening in the round. You can flick one tap a guy across the map. The game does not care. Your team still has zero points unless that kill wins you the round or helps in doing so.
Counter strike is played at two levels. The micro-level which is you, your cross-hair, and what you see on your screen and your micro-level mind games with a specific individual from the enemy team. And the macro-level, which is kind of a game of chess and rock/papescissors both at the same time where 10 players are moving dynamically across the map and reacting and responding to events in the game. Every player MUST always be aware of the status of the macro-level game at any point in the round. That is to say, you need to be aware of the location of your teammates, known enemy positions, possible/expected enemy positions as well as any other relevant info you get or is relayed to you during the course of the round. This should be second-nature, you kind of do it sub-consciously. For this you need to learn to quickly glance at the map, every few seconds, and stay alert to absorb any info provided from team comms. This is a necessary and important skill you must master. You need to do this at all times, everyone does that, and there are no excuses for not doing it. Based on all this information, you form a mental picture of how the round is developing and you can then ask yourself the question, given the available information, what can I as an individual and/or my team as a collective do at this point in time, which will give my team the best possible chaance of winning the round while taking the minimising the amount of riisk tasken. Notice that there is no mention of kills in all of this. Kills are helpful only if they are necessary to execute the plan that you formed with your team.
While we are on that subject, all kills are not created equal. Mowing down five guys with glocks will show 5 kills next to your name on the scoreboard, but your teammate who went to bombsite A and one tapped the awper which gave you control of the site and most likely the round, has 1 kill which is 10 times more important and valuable then your easy five kills. Any decent observer of the game, will ignore your 5 anti-eco kills. Also contrary to popular opinion just because you got the most kills in a round or even the most kills during the game does not mean your kills were the most valuable or you had the the biggest contribution in winning the round/game. You as a player will be judged on how well you did YOUR role in the context of a specific round. Did you make the right decisions based on the information available to you, in that round at that point? Did you hit the shots you were "supposed to hit" and win the duels you were supposed to win? Yes? You have an A grade, congratulations. Did you go above and beyond that? You have a distinction.
If you are not the guy being setup for kills or the enemy generally do not attack your site, you will not have a high amount of kills, no matter how good your aim is, or how good you are individually. Bottom line, know what the scoreboard can tell about the performance of the players and what it cannot tell, and use it accordingly. Last example, your teammate got the entry and you killed 2 people camping in post-plant when they did not know where you are or they were fighting your teammates and you shot them in the back. His one kill is more important then your 2 kills. Enough said on people's obsession with kills.
ALWAYS play to win the round. All good counter strike players play and do whatever is necessary to win the round, while taking on the minimal riisk possible. All bad counter strike players, play for kills and whine about getting baited or dieing, or brag about their kills if they are doing well in that department. It is a team game, you win and lose as a team. If running with your kniife out and dieing will give your team the best possible chaance of winning the round, be fearless in doing so, and have zero hesitation in following the optimal course of action. You can have 5 kills in a round and still lose the round, and in that case, no one cares about your 5 kills. On the other hand, you can have zero kills and still win the round for your team. For example, by having a great read, baiting for your teammate, throwing a great flash etc. etc.
The round is dynamic and constantly evolving over time. You need to be able to adjust and adopt at the drop of a dime, as everything will not always go according to your initial plan, teammates may die, other team may make an unexpected move, someone may fail a smoke, etc etc. So you need to constantly analyse the state of the round as of that moment, and make the best possible play which will give you the best chaance of winning the round while taking the least amount of riisk. For example, you plan to execute on B at start of the round out of spawn. You move 5 towards B and see 4 CTs rushing towards you from B site, don't be stubborn and dumb and say we are still going B come hell or high-water. You abort your initial plan, because as of that moment, given the information available to you, it is not the optimal plan and you take the path of least resistance and go A.
Most outcomes of rounds are decided based on which team makes the best mid-round decisions. You (mostly) default as T and gather information. Some early round kills may be exchanged and other stuff may happen. And both sides are left with some sort of X vs X situation. 5 vs 4, 2 vs 3, 3 vs 4 etc. etc. The side which plays this situation the best while working on their strengths and shielding their weakness will win the round. In order to do this you need to be able to react fast, extremely fast, to events and situations arising in-game, a window of opportunity may open just for a second, if you as an individual and your team as a collective are able seize that opportunity you will stand as victors, if you are too slow and indecisive, that window will be long gone, and you are back to square one.
Take initiative when it is needed. If you pushing long as T on dust 2, and no one is smoking/flashing CT or holding the push through CT smoke and you are further back, take initiative and hold the goddam smoke, and call to your team, ct smoke is held so they have one less thing to worry about and they can focus on the site. Plug holes, which are not plugged. And be alert enough to recognise things which no one is attending to. Be alert and respond quickly to what your teammate is saying/asking from you. Keep the information processing time of your brain as low as possible. You don't need to be TOLD everything, use your own brain as well. If someone is not holding a choke point, hold the god-dam angle and call it. also play with your team and listen to your teammates at all times. Team-play plus Tactics plus Playing smart will always win over individual skill, in a large majority of cases, even at the highest level. That is how the game is designed with the low time to kill damage model, one man is not supposed to get more then 1 kill, or 2 on a good day. Anything more is a mega bonus. Individual skill can win you rounds here and there but it is teamplay and tactics which win you the game.
Know your role in the round, no one is going to explicitly state your role, in a pug environment, you need to have enough game sense to understand what your best role would be given your position and place in the round. This is not team cs, you need to be able to improvise on the spot. If you are hitting a site as a team and you happen to be at the front of the pack. No prizes for guessing your job is to entry. Good players will judge you on how well you did "your job" and not how many kills you get. As an entry 90 percent of the time you will die and that is expected. If you get one kill you have done great, if you get 2, you are a God. But that is not your job. Your job is to run in fearlessly, be as hard to hit as possible, and a) create space for your team b) give fast, accurate, useful and concise info about the enemy positions/guns/damage status so that your teammates have the best possible chaance of trading you. If you run in and die but gave great info and make space for your team, you have done your job. Your marks are 10 out of 10 for your role in that round.
When you hit a site as a team, key buzzword is TRADE, TRADE, TRADE and then play the post-plant intelligently. That can only happen if people do their role. Entry runs in like a maniac, and gives info and people following him, should have proper spacing with the entry and also amongst themselves. If you are too far apart, and run in one by one, you will all die against any good player. If you are too close, you will still die and get mowed down by one guy. You need to have the appropriate spacing so that you are able to swing just as the the enemy is shooting or done shooting your teammate and his recoil has not reset. So you move in when he is most vulnerable and kill him boom. This is a good bait. And that is your job if you are behind the entry. You are the baiter, it is not a derogatory term, it is your role. In-fact if you do not bait correctly and ensure the kill, you have not done your job and you are bad at your role. you NEED to do it well/correctly if your team wants to win.
Always play as a team, and with your team. If someone suggests something play with him and listen to him, if you can't do that for whatever reason or you have a bettter plan, then say so clearly and loudly so there is no confusion. If someone asks for a flash, that flash needs to come in the next 2 seconds, not 10 hours from now. Also it is a good idea to say "flash" when you throw the flash and "bang" when it pops so your teammate does not get confused distinguishing between your flash and enemy flashes and other random noise/chaos and peek at wrong time or get blind by enemy flash or even your own flash. Last but not least, remember the objective and keep the objective above everything else. If it means letting your teammate die, so be it, his life is not important. If completing the objective requires you to help your teammate, and dance in front of him with your kniife out and act as a meat shield, then that is what you do. You or your teammates are not the center of the universe. The only thing that matters is whether your team gets a point at the end of the round or not.
One final point about a common mistake that many people make, do not judge or justify how good a decision is by its outcome. By the same token, a good decision does not become bad by an unfavourable outcome. That's dumb. You or your team can do something which is stupid as hell but still win the round, but that does not mean what you did was right. It just means you got lucky, or hit some amazing shots or your enemy fucked up. But no one would say you are a good cs player or you are a good cs team, despite the fact that the outcome was in your favour. As a basic and super simple example, lets say you have 3 players alive as a T and the enemy only has one. You go B as a group and see/hear that the lone CT is on bombsite B. You have to make a decision here whether you go back to A or go B. The criteria for the best decision is that "it should give your team the best possible chaance of winning the round while assuming the minimum amount of riisk". In this scenario, the correct answer, based on this criteria is to go back to A. You could go B and kill the guy on B, or trade him, and still win the round. But that will not make your bad decision good. It will still be a bad decision and any analyst or commentator will say that you are a bad team or a bad cs player for making that decision. This is because doing so was a riisk as there is a chaance, albeit a small one, that the CT kills all 3 and you lose the round. There is a fine line between stupidity and bravery, know the difference between the two. An analogy of this situation is that as the T if you go B, it is equivalent to betting that you will NOT get a SIX, if you roll a dice. Here getting a six represents the low probability that the enemy will kill all 3 of you. But there is still a SMALL RiISK that you MIGHT get a six, which is a riisk taken for no additional reward. So be smart and don't play dice, and do whatever is necessary to guarantee the round. It could be the case that you lose the round because of your stupidity and you get money fucked and lose the following rounds and maybe even lose the whole game. All this because of one dumb act of bravado. If there were 2 top tier pro teams playing a big tournament, and they were in the same situation as above, the Ts would never go B and always go A, because they put ensuring the objective above their egos and play good counter strike, based on sound principles. They don't do this because they are scared or pussies or they feel their aim is not good. They do this because they are not stupid. riisk taken for no reward is dumb and it does not make you a stud.
Long story short, in order to be consistent as a player and as a team, always take the path of least resistance, that minimises the riisk incurred in achieving your objective. This is not rocket science, most of the above is common sense, and that is how the whole world plays counter strike. These are the fundamentals and basics of the game, that a player at any level should understand and be familiar with.
Some Random Tid Bits
Rules for Rotation: Every site has an "anchor" player. If help is needed on the other site, he will stay put. He will only rotate if one of two conditions are met. Otherwise he will never rotate.
  1. Bomb is Down and your team has complete control over the bomb
  2. The bomb is spotted and the enemy team does not have enough time to go back to the other site.
Contrary to popular belief mere spotting of bomb is NOT sufficient condition for the anchor to rotate. Because the other team can run strategies where they show bomb on one site and have 1/2 guys lurking on the other site (or not). When your anchor rotates they kill him or let him go and have the site for free. And the bomb goes back to the other site. you most likely lose this round.
Your role as a CT player:
  1. Try to get advance info of enemy attack, in order to buy as much time for backup to rotate and assist in defending the site.
  2. If attack commences, delay and stall as long as possible with nades etc to buy time for back up to arrive so back up has a greater chaance to retake/defend the site and defuse the bomb in time.
  3. Once the enemies starts coming into the site, stand your ground and fight to your death. Don't run away (by running away I mean do not leave the site premises completely and give the site for free, but this is contextual, maybe you got a quick kill or two, you have the right to leave the site and use bettter numbers to retake, you are also ok to dance around obstacles within the site, and delay the plant for as long as possible by staying alive for as long as possible and taking a fight only when it is impossible to avoid). Also no one expects you to kill all 5 if the Ts hit your site. If you get 1, you did OKish, if you get 2 you did great. Anything more, and you are a God. If you are playing a retake setup on one site (usually a site which is easier to retake), it is OK to just spot for info and don't fight. Or just use your nades to stall without taking fights or riisking your life. If you get smoked off completely, it is OK to play retake in that situation as well, all this is contextual.
Communication: If you can't hear your team, or your teammates can't hear you, sort it out in advance or as soon as the issue is spotted. Don't mention it after the fact. Call numbers and call the bomb. You can also see the bomb on the map if your teammates see the bomb. So irrespective of his call of bomb, you should know when bomb is spotted, screaming "B, B , B" is not a good call, the more you progress through the ranks, the more these kind of calls will be punished heavily by the enemy. I will put my hand up and say I am guilty of this mistake as well (even though I am aware of it). Unless you call All "A" or All long, your teammates would know they need to watch out for any possible lurkers or flankers while they rotate to come to help you. Otherwise they can run with their kniife out, without any fear, to get to you as fast as possible. Calling numbers and calling bomb will also make you less vulnerable to fakes.
Final Thoughts: Be positive and respect all your teammates, irrespective of their ability in a video game. If you are bettter then someone, it does not give you license to be a dickhead. If you want respect, give respect. No matter how good you are, no one will respect you, if you act like an asshole. Know the difference between constructive and polite criticism, communicated in a respectful manner, so that the other person does not get offended and degrading a person for making mistakes or being bad at the game. It's OK to be bad at a video game, or be bad at anything else for that matter.
Also helpful tips or identification of mistakes, here and there, is good, but don't bombard people with so much feedback that they feel overwhelmed. Or fear that every single time they fuck up even slightly 4 people will laugh at them or yell in their ears that they suck. In such a case, they will get up-tight and play nervous. They will also lose all confidence and second-guess every single move they make. More likely then not they will play even worse then how they normally do, and you will even lose any minor contribution you would have got from them. So its a lose-lose situation for all parties and this kind of behaviour will most definitely not help you to win more games of counter strike.
Expect people to play at their skill level, if someone is a lower skill level, he is going to play like a low-skill level player, this is expected and there should be no surprises. Moreover, he is most definitely not going to improve overnight or right in the middle of that game, right after your "live coaching".
If you are relying on such players to win the round for you, or play any role in winning the round, you will always be frustrated. As that is simply not going to happen. You are also putting undue pressure on him to do what he simply lacks the skill to do, mechanical or otherwise. Just provide moderate amount of guidance and for the most part let them do their thing and have fun. If they do something good, consider it a bonus., a Christmas present. If you follow this approach you will always be pleased by how they are playing, and they will also have a bettter time in game.
TLDR: If you can take away just one thing from all this, be continuously obsessed with one question and one question only (both as an individual and as a team) and that question is "how are we winning this god-dam round?" If you can articulate an answer to this question that you can explain to your little brother or little sister, with regards to the logic of HOW and WHY your plan would work, you will automatically become twice the player and twice the team you are. I can guarantee this much.
It is a useful exercise to unbind the scoreboard key, there is nothing of value in the scoreboard while you are in game. Scoreboard is a reflection (and in many cases an inaccurate reflection) of what happened in the past. It is only a distraction and takes your mind off the present moment. In 90 percent of the cases, the scoreboard is of little benefit while in game and in a high number of cases obsessing over the scoreboard will have a detrimental effect on your and your team's performance. Your job is to focus on the present moment and the current round. Each round is an independent event (not exactly but it is a useful approximation for the current context). If you did well in the past, you may play overconfident, overextend or do something stupid and cause your team to lose the current round.
If you did badly in the past, you may hesitate to make the right move because you lost confidence or you start playing scared. Most likely this will have a snowball effect, and you will under perform for the rest of the game, in general. What happened in the past is gone. It cannot be changed. Focus on the controllables and the only thing within your control is the best decision and the best action you can take, in the present moment, that will help your team to win the current round. This is also a useful life lesson.
Thanks
Post Script: The reason why I went out of my way to distinguish between killing enemies and the ultimate objective is because there can be scenarios where these two things can stand in contradiction. I wanted to focus on the more cerebral and non-mechanical aspects of the game in this guide. As I see lower ranks either make kills the ultimate objective OR have difficulty in recognising scenarios where going for kills might actually undermine or lower the chances of achieving your objective.
Counter strike is a multi-faceted game and there are many components to a skill-set of a good cs team and a good cs player and the ability to kill is just one of them. It is certainly a very important component but there are many other components which are equally as important, and still others which might be argued to be even more important, especially when a baseline level of mechanical skill has been achieved. One would be well served as a player by developing those skills, in addition to your aim, if your goals is to get better at the game.
Thus I am not saying that killing enemies is useless or unimportant. I do not wish to understate its importance but I also wanted to make sure that I do not overstate its importance either. When push comes to shove, in a great majority of rounds, some enemies may have to be killed in order to secure a win. Armed enemy players are a significant obstacle to meeting your objective. So generally speaking, the lower the number of enemy players alive the easier it will be for you to complete your task.
So please keep what I said in the right perspective and understand the reasons for me to word things the way I did. As long as you put killing enemies in its appropriate role as a "means to an end" and NOT an end itself. You should be good to go.
submitted by oceandream121 to GlobalOffensive [link] [comments]

A Simple Guide for Those New to "CS Style" Gameplay

I'm not sure how many people will read this (or care about it), but if it reaches even a few people, that's great. I've been playing competitive shooters for a very long time, over 15 years of CS, GM in Overwatch, COD, Battlefield, BRs. But CS is my pride and joy. I figured I'd whip up some really simple tips for those that might need to hear it.
You're welcome to ask questions if you have it, I'll respond to anything I can (and I'm sure others will answer questions you might have as well!)
Again: this guide is not for players that are experienced in CS already or for CS styled games. This is more for our Overwatch and League and whatever other players that might be experimenting with this style for the first time.
I know this guide is going to be long even before I start writing it, I am going to break it up as best as possible, skip to areas you feel you need if necessary.
Again, maybe no one will read this, or I'll be downvoted for trying, or it'll just be lost in the sea of highlights, or whatever else. But if it reaches a couple of people that find it helpful, I'll be stoked about that.

Editors Notes

I might add more sections to this if someone suggests something and the activity hasn't tapered off. I will mark new sections with an asterisk (*) in this case, I just added the "Win Conditions" section.
Also; I really do enjoy teaching CS/CS Styled Games. If there's a question you're too embarrassed to ask in public, or you just want some friendly tips, my DMs are always open. If I get overwhelmed with messages, I might be slow to respond, but I'll try and get to everything. I love CS (and Valorant is growing on me), and I love teaching it and talking about it. So if you want help, find me!
Edit 2: Thanks for the golds and random awards guys. I'm really stoked to see that people like this guide and are getting some good usage out of it! I'm glad I could help some of you! Keep practicing out there!
Edit 3: Learning to aim well, learn the gunplay, etc * I'm getting a LOT of questions from people looking for help learning how to aim, or improve their shooting mechanics. I'm going to post here what I've been telling a lot of them.
There really aren't any "shortcuts" to learning how to aim. A guide like mine, or a video on YouTube might give you tips on controlling recoil, or counter-strafing, or lowering your sensitivity. But really, you just gotta PRACTICE. CS has existed in one form or another for over 20 years now, some of us have a LOT of experience and it's ingrained into our muscle memory. You can't expect to learn that type of thing over night. Run the bot training in the Practice Range until you can get 30 out of 30 every time. Practice controlling your spray. Practice burst firing and tap firing. Just hop in live games and do your best.
I promise, if you keep practicing, the aim will come. No one out there can give you some magic trick that will suddenly turn you into the best aimer in the world. You just have to keep on trying!
Edit #4: I added a few new terms to the Glossary towards the bottom, they are marked with an asterisk (*). If I think of more, I might tack them on.

Win Conditions *

u/Helfeather suggested a write up on exactly how rounds are won and lost, and I liked the idea so much I'm adding it to the BEGINNING of this post.
Winning a round in CS is done one of 4 ways, I'm gonna name them, and give a brief explanation of how to maximize your chances of that happening.

Attacker

Planting the bomb the Spike (or "Bomb" as CS players might call it) gets planted at one of the two (or three) bomb sites. If that bomb blows up, regardless of how many players are still alive on EITHER team, the Attackers win. The bomb timer is 45 seconds long, and once it's down the timer begins. The most important thing to remember to win off a bomb plant is to, what we call, "playing the bomb". Instead of leaving the site and trying to find the remaining Defenders, put yourself in a position where you can see the bomb, and are covered from as many angles as possible. Make the Defenders come to you! The more often you do this, the better chance of a detonation you have.
Eliminating all the enemies Even if the bomb is never planted, eliminating all the enemy Defenders wins you the round. Simple as that really, play your role on the team, and if you get 5 kills before they do, you win the round.

Defender

Defusing the bomb once the bomb has been planted, your only concern should be defusing it. I'm not sure exactly how long the defuse timer is in this game, someone can jump in with that information, but defusing the bomb successfully is a round won even if there are still Attackers left alive. "Retaking" the bomb site if all the defenders from that position are dead is your best bet. Wait for your team mates to be close enough, and push in together. (At this point, basically pretend YOU'RE the attacker and play the same way you would on the Attack side of the game.) Push in togehter, check your corners, and make your way to the bomb. If you're last alive and you can't find the remaining Attacker(s), something you can do to try and draw them out is called Fake Defusing. You walk up to the bomb and press 4 (or whatever you're defuse bind is), this will make a sound that notifies enemy players that you've begun defusing. At that point you can immediately release 4 and watch to see where they come from to attack you.
This is a bit of a mini-game within the game. Good players know about faking a defuse, so they might not peek straight away. So you might be able to get away with holding the defuse even when theres an enemy lurking about. (Colloquially you might hear a CS player say something like "PROS DONT FAKE" which is a bit of a CS meme. The implication that Pro players don't ever fake defusing a bomb, they just hold it, so you have to peek THEM.)
A BIG TIP about fake defusing here: if you fake defuse and then make a foot step sound, the enemies will know you are not still defusing. You can't walk and defuse at the same time, so if you fake defuse and want to adjust your position, WALK. Use shift and readjust while you wait for them to come out!
Eliminating all the enemies Just like on Attack, if you eliminate all the enemies before the bomb is planted, you win the round. BUT REMEMBER unlike the Attacker side, if the bomb has been planted, and you kill all the enemies, you still need to defuse it. If there isn't enough time left, and the bomb blows up, the Attackers still win the round even if they're all dead. So either kill 'em quick, or don't forget about that bomb!
Time running out the Defenders have an additional win condition of the round clock. If the timer hits 0 and the bomb has not been planted, the Defenders win. Even if all 5 members of the enemy team are still alive. Even if the bomb is planted JUST AFTER the clock hits 0, the Defenders win. This is where "stalling" comes in to play. If you're holding a bomb site and it's late in the round and an Attacker tries to sneak in and get a plant, stall him. Shoot at him and make him stop the plant animation. If you can stall him long enough to either A: get your team mates there, or B: run out of time, you can win the round without even needing to kill him. Stalling is huge.

Defender Side

Positioning

One of the big things to remember is to pick a site to defend, and stay there for the whole game. When you're on the Defender side (or CT as some CS players might refer to it), whatever site you're assigned, or have chosen, or are playing, it's important to not suddenly switch to another site without saying anything.
If you aren't comfortable with the site, ask if someone is willing to swap with you. If you think you can't play a site alone, ask for someone to back you up.
Sometimes someone might suggest stacking a site, or playing more than the usual number there, that's fine. If YOU feel like they might come A, let people know you're giving up B site to stack A. But don't just leave your spot without saying anything, it can leave sites open if people are unaware, or force people to defend from unoptimal positions.

Rotations

Rotating is when the bomb is seen or a push of one site is called by a team mate. Knowing when to rotate (and how to rotate) is crucial to good CT sided defense. One important thing to be aware of is whether or not the bomb has been seen or called. If you're at B and one of the A players calls that three are pushing into A, but they haven't seen the bomb yet, it might be good to hang back at B and "lurk" until bomb is spotted.
It might leave your team with one less player to defend A, but it prevents a bomb site from being left completely open. If you lurk at the opposite site when bomb isn't spotted, even if you cant kill the enemies coming in, you can relay the information to your team that the bomb is coming to THAT site instead of A.
By the same token, if the bomb is called as seen on A, even if you know someone is at B, as long as you're not in an active fight with him, it might be better to just leave him there and move to A to defend the bomb. Inform your team that someone was at B, and they might come from the flank, but the Attackers can't win without the Spike, so it's better for you to defend from the bomb instead.
If you're playing a bomb site with a team mate, and one of you needs to rotate to defend a bomb site, communicate it. Tell them you're leaving them to back up B (or C), and that you think they should lurk until the bomb is spotted. Don't just up and leave without letting them know.
Learning the pacing of rotations is one of the harder skills of CS to master, not over-rotating or under-rotating can often be the difference between winning and losing a round. Don't fret if you're not grasping it immediately, it will take some time!

Playing a site with a team mate

Some bomb sites are going to be defended by only one player (maps where mid is very important, or Haven where it's better to have 2 at B/mid than 2 at C.) But if you're defending with another player, it's important to work together.
Have a "default setup" to defend from, one person watches long, the other watches short, stay at that spot unless it's discussed between you and your partner that you're going to be off position. Don't leave someones blind side open without telling them that you're not there.
Sometimes you two might decide to push together, either both of you pushing from the same angle, or both pushing from separate sides to pinch potential attackers. Sometimes you might want to play further back a more passive angle and let them get in before contact.

Attacker Side

Where to attack/play/watch

Attacker (or T side as CS players might call it), is a much more complex and dynamic side than the defenders. Different maps, diffrent opponents, different economy situations will call for different types of attack.
Some of the basic styles that you might hear called by a team mate:
Rush - this ones pretty simple, someone is suggesting that the entire attacker team (or at least most of them) fully rush into the site and over whelm the defenders with numbers. This can often mean rushing THROUGH smokes or flashbangs. A rush only works if everyone gets into the site and no one is left alone on site, or lingering behind a smoke. If a rush is called, just do your best to get in site with your team mates, find the enemy, and do what you can.
(I don't want to get any grief for this, so I'm adding a little editors note here: pushing through a smoke is not ALWAYS the play, even on a rush. Sometimes it's the right thing, other times it's not, but it's very situational. But it's important to remember that smokes are not impenetrable walls that can never be walked through. Sometimes the smartest play is the one that seems dumbest, walking (or even running) through a smoke might seem dumb, but sometimes it's going to catch the enemy off guard. So basicaly, don't always rush through smokes, but don't always be afraid to rush through smokes either.)
Split - a "split" attack is performed at a site that has more than one entrance. Say A Site on Haven, you might send 3 players to long and 2 players short and attack from both sides. Whether or not you push a smoke or not will depend on the situation, but the idea here is to attack a limited defense from multiple sides before they can call a rotation from their team mates.
Playing for Picks - when a team mate suggests playing for picks, this means that you separate to different areas of the map, and play a slightly more passive role while waiting for a Defender to get aggressive and give up a kill. You might send 2 to A, 1 to mid, and 2 to B, no body pushes in, everyone communicates where they are spotting (or hearing) enemies, and you wait for someone to make a move.
Once someone GETS a pick, your team will have to collectively decide if you want to "push off the pick", which means you start pushing into the site you got the pick on. Or if you want to "play for the rotate", which means you guys will assume the Defenders are going to rotate to make up for the dead CT, and the Attackers move to the opposite bomb site.
Contact - a "contact" play is a slower take of a bomb site. The majority of the team will group up at one bomb site, and move slowly. Everyone will walk, you won't throw smokes or flashes or any utility until you've seen an enemy. Once you've seen an enemy, or (more importantly an enemy has seen you), then you fully commit. Get smokes down, flash in, take the site. The goal here is to get as close to the site as possible before the enemy can call that you're there and ask for backup from his team. But once you're spotted, no more time for lurking, push into the site as fast as possible, cover up the entrances, and get the bomb down.
Set Take - a set take is going to be a scenario where your team mates drop smokes (and other utility) at predetermined positions to cut off the enemy team. Typically it goes as follows: the team will set up outside of, say, B site, a specific time on the clock will be agreed to (say 45 seconds), at which time characters with smokes (in this case namely Brimstone) will drop his smokes in key spots to cut off defender visibility and rotations, and you'll all rush in together. Set takes can be very powerful if you know the defenders play from passive positions. And with all the different types of utility in the game, you can smoke angles out, and then use one of the AOE attacks (fire, freeze, grenade) to flush enemies out of corners.

Planting "safe" vs planting "open"

There are two main types of plants for the bomb. If you're unaware of where the enemy is, especially if theres only 2 or 3 Attackers left, you might plant "safe". Planting in a corner that covers you from as many angles as possible, on B site Bind, planting inside the tube for example. This is to minimize risk of you dying while planting.
But planting OPEN is usually a much better alternative. If you have full control of the site (you've taken it with 3 or 4 of your team mates still alive), try to plant in the open. Somewhere that you can defend it from multiple angles. Rely on your team mates to cover your open angles and not get shot while planting.
Regardless of which type you plant, try to call where you're planting for your team mates. Just say "planting safe" and they'll know the bomb is going to be tucked in a corner. "Planted for Long" would mean that one of your team mates can defend from the "long" entrance to the bombsite and still be able to see the CT when they try to defuse.
As the game progresses, bomb sites will organically develop a "default" plant. This is the spot that you plant in that is reasonably safe, but you're not sure if you're safe or not. Saying "planted default" will immediately let team mates know exactly where the bomb is.
Strategies can get a lot more complex, "fakes" are when you draw a lot of attention to one site with utility, gunshots, visible angles, wait for CTs to start rotating, and then you fall back and take the now empty (or weaker) site. At more advanced levels, there might be decoy plays, where 4 players rush a site and 1 lone player with bomb tries to sneak in the other side and get a plant. (Useful on Eco or Save rounds.)

Communication

Good communication is perhaps the most important thing to a successful game of Valorant. It's a very complex issue, and rather than dragging it out too long, I'm just going to touch on a few key topics.
As a defender try to be precise with your calls. Instead of "they're coming A", try to say HOW MANY are coming A when possible. "3 A", or "I hear multiple Long A" is better than just "they're here".
Remember to call the bomb if it's seen if you've seen the bomb, either on an Attacker or just down on the ground, relay this information to your team. Your team mates can then start to safely leave their bomb sites and make their way to you to defend.
Try not to talk after you're dead in most cases, once you die, you should just let the other players play. If you saw someone or heard someone that you REALLY think the person you're spectating didn't see, then tell them quickly, and then quiet down again. "You saw him behind the box", something along those lines is concise and if the player you're watching was unaware, they'll work off that information.
Short reminders are helpful, even after you're dead but be quick, and don't try to micro manage. If you're on Attack, and only one of your team mates is alive, he is going to want to keep his eyes only on his crosshair and what's in front of him. If he is low on time, typically just saying "time" will remind him that he has to speed it up a little bit, or decide to save his gun. Reminding him he still has utility left if he may have forgotten is also usually okay, but again, don't micro manage, don't tell him how to use them, just remind him and let him focus on his game.
Once freeze time has ended, non-game related chatter should end, during buy time if you're laughing about the previous round, or just shooting the breeze, great, but once buy time ends, trail off the conversation and focus on listening for enemies, and hearing the calls of your team mates.
Be quick about calls try to be as concise with them as you possibly can. "3 Long A" is enough information, you don't need to tell your team exactly what guns they have, where they're positioned, what they are wearing, how they've styled their hair. If someone asks for additional information ("have you seen bomb?") answer of course, but getting the call out fast is more important than up to the minute information.
Calling places you're unfamiliar with everyones new to this game, even the CS players. Sometimes you're not going to know the "official" name for a location, or even what it's been colloquially referred to as. But getting out something is better than nothing. On Haven, most people will understand what you mean if you say they are "C Hall", most people will get it if you refer to A long on Bind as either "bathrooms" or "long", or "showers" or "toilets" for you Europeans. Terms like "behind you" and "to your right" only work if people know exactly where you are/were playing and who you're referring to. Using generic terms for locations is the better choice if you don't know or can't remember what its called.
Most importantly however is to find the right flow with your team. Some types of teams function better with more information, some want every little thing called. Some teams will want as little as possible called. Some players/teams don't mind if everyones chatting while playing, some do. CS/Valorant styled games are often considered more "serious" than some other shooters, but it still should be fun. Find the right times to talk and laugh and be silly while also letting those that want to "try hard" do so.

Trading and Baiting

This section could fit in all the other sections, so I'm going to give it it's own.
Trading is the act of responding to a kill from the enemy team with a kill from YOUR team. So say you and a partner are entering a bombsite that hasn't been cleared yet. Even if you time things perfectly, chances are one of you will be seen before the other. Sometimes that first person isn't going to get the kill, it is important for you to be in position to return the kill.
Trading is HUGELY important. Having a man advantage in Valorant can make all the difference, and no player is going to survive every round, everyone will die their share of times in the game, so it's very important to be in position to "trade" the kill and keep the numbers even.
The keys to doing this are to just work with your team mates. Push in with them, don't leave them stranded on their own, and if they die, try to kill their attacker.
Baiting on the other hand, is sort of a modified form of a trade. Baiting can be very negative (willfully letting your team mate die so that you can get the kill instead of them), but baiting can also be used intelligently. If your team mate is already on extremely low health, he might say something like "bait me". Which means you will play very slowly behind him while he rushes into the site, his job is to find the enemy, do any damage (if possible) and tell you where he is so you can immediately peek out and take the kill without taking any damage yourself.
The difference between "good baiting" and "bad baiting" is usually as simple as communication. If you're not telling your team mate you're playing back, and you let them die just so you can get the kill, thats a bad bait.
But if you inform your team mate that you're going to bait him for information, usually they won't mind, especially if they are low on health, or perhaps don't have a gun.

CS-Style Glossary

There's lots of terms that you might not be familiar with coming from other games, I know there have already been other guides and videos on this stuff, but I figured I'd add in a few, and repeat a couple of them. These are terms that CS players are accustomed to using, and might instinctively call, especially in the heat of the moment.
AK - AK is the Vandal
M4 - That's the Phantom.
MP5 - Would be the Spectre.
Deagle - The Sheriff.
Scout - The Marshall
CZ - The Frenzy.
A-W-P - The Operator. (Some people, namely Europeans, call it by it's initials A-W-P instead of "Awp", for Americans Riot preemptively negated this issue by naming the AWP an "Operator" which is easily shortened to the AWP homonym "Op".
Bomb - The Spike itself.
Save - This can have two meanings. 1: a save round, your team is short on money and you should avoid spending a lot. A pistol, maybe a couple of your abilities. You want to keep at least 3900 for the next round (visible on the Buy menu). 2: saving your guns, sometimes as either attacker or defender, a round is deemed unwinnable. Maybe you're last alive with 5 Attackers having already planted the bomb, if your teams money is low, you might choose to save your gun. Typically you'll find a place far away on the map to hide, be silent, and hope you dont get found. Save the gun for your next round.
Eco - Same as a "save round" detailed above.
D-Eco (pronounced dee-coh) - Just a save round where you all buy the powerful Sheriff (Deagle) for hopes of one shot kills against armored enemies.
Long (bombsite) or Short (bombsite) - A lot of the bombsites in this game will have multiple entrance. Usually one being a longer "straighter" path, and the second being a shorter and more "cluttered" path. Long, and short respectively.
Mid - * Mid refers literally to the "middle" of the map. The area between A and B (on a two site map). On most maps, having mid control is very important as it allows you to attack a bomb site from an additional area. On Split for example. The B bombsite only has one "natural" entrance, the garage tunnel. The other entrance to B is the upper walkway that connects to mid. If the Attackers can gain control of mid by killing Defenders, they can attack B from two sides instead of just one.
(Note: the maps in Valorant seem less reliant on having a normal CS styled mid. In CS, mid is typically a very pronounced "lane" to steal a moba term. But in Valorant, a lot of the mids (even on the 2 site maps) are kind of split. Bind for example, both the area connecting Attacker spawn to Hookah could be considered a mid, as well as potentially the area from Attacker spawn to "short A".Neither are really your typical mid, normally a mid has access to BOTH bomb sites equally. The Attacker spawn to Hookah does not have fast rotation to A, only to B. Meanwhile, the Attacker spawn to Portal side DOES have a fast rotation to both A AND B, but it's also directly connected to an exposed A bomb site, which makes it more of a "short A" than a mid.
Which area of a map is determined as "mid" will happen organically by players as we move forward.
Heaven - * Heaven is a term you might hear a lot from CS players. It typically refers to any designated upper area on a bomb site. I'm not talking just a box in the middle of the site that a Jett or Raze may have boosted onto, but areas specificly elevated. On Bind, there is an upper ledge at the back of A, this would typically be referred to as a "Heaven". (Note, if an enemy is standing directly underneath this walkway, they are often referred to as being "under heaven" or "hell".
DD - * "D-D" will refer to "double doors", right now this is only present on Haven, but it's something you might hear called. Just a faster way of calling that someone is playing in, at or around the double doors near B.
Window - * Someone calling that someone is in "window" would be an area LIKE a "heaven" spot, except covered a little bit better. What Americans have begun calling "Hookah" on Bind is an example of a "Window" spot. It's elevated, and has more cover than a Heaven-named spot does (compare it to "heaven" on A site).
Default - another one with multiple meanings. 1: A default hold is all 5 Defenders playing from their usual positions, no stacks, no weird positioning or doubling up, just your normal. 2: A default TAKE is all 5 attackers running a pre-determined strategy. Usually it has all 5 players spreading out and playing for picks (each of you at a predetermined spot, similar to on Defense). and 3: the "default plant", I mentioned this above, but basically as the game progresses, players will organically determine which the "default plant" spot is. This is a spot that is a little bit open, but also a little bit safe in case there are enemies lurking unknown.
Execute - as sort of detailed above, an execute is just the take of a bombsite. "We're executing A" usually means they're putting their smokes and AOE down, and moving in. This is a warning to players that might be lurking at other sites or mid to either listen for rotations from enemies, or start making their way over to A to help defend the planted bomb.
Boosted - * A player being "boosted" means they are on top of a box or other area of the map that they couldn't normally get to solo. Jett, Raze, Omen and Sage can get to some of these locations by themselves, and there have been various methods for boosting team mates on top of your head. So if someone calls "boosted on A site" it probably means they are up on top of a box or other object on the bomb site.
I think that's all I got for now. Again, this is meant just to include some really basic information for players new to a CS style game. I didn't include anything overly advanced, nor did I include every potential "basic" thing about the game, I'm sure there are already plenty of guides on exactly when to buy and save and force buy and all that.
If you have any questions, I'd be happy to answer them if I'm capable of doing so. Others that are knowledgeable are welcome to do the same.
If this helps you at all, I'm a happy camper.
Good luck out there, and have fun!
submitted by bustedmagnets to VALORANT [link] [comments]

Choice of Majors is driving me crazy!! Advice needed!!

Hey guys! Hope you're well! How's your summer going?
I'm currently majoring in Accounting, doing super well .. but just not happy. I've studied STEM based learning in all previous years of higher education (Grade 11 and Quebec college). I took a bet on business school as I wanted to learn some general principals of accounting and finance for life, so if I'd ever start my own business, I'd be ready to implement.
Turns out, I'm not super interested in what I'm studying. I'm getting lots of As, but I don't like what I'm learning. I also don't like how heavy a part group projects have in the overall course grade breakdown (somewhere between 30-60% overall). I often have to carry my group. I know it's representative of life, I'm cool with that, I just hate the volatility of my grades, as my overarching goal is med/dent school. Moreover, my faculty has a curving policy that forces our class averages to remain between B+ and B-.. really depends on how much the prof likes/hates us!
I've been really down to transfer back to sciences. The mere thought of going back to business makes me fee a lil sick.
I'm interested in transferring to the following programs, to give me an employable major along with the opportunity to proceed to med school at a later date (possibly).
  1. CS/BIO joint major -> I'm fairly strong at math, haven't really coded anything other than HTML/CSS/PHP, and bio is somewhat interesting to me.
  2. Civil engineering -> I like physics a lot. The idea of planning out rooms, kitchens, houses, buildings, roads, bridges, anything really is pretty cool to me. I love construction sites. I think I'd be pretty good at this major.
  3. Kine -> easiest major of them all, a lot of easy-A courses, most likely my best chance to get a 4.0 GPA and a small bit of knowledge for med school. It's not employable, and I'd most likely need to pursue another degree of med doesn't work out. High risk, high reward, but low difficulty. I'm super interested in physiatrist type jobs.
For civil and CS/BIO, I'd have to beg the faculties to let me in. I have a very strong academic record, even stronger volunteer + work experience (run a family business at 21).
Essentially, I want to get past this stage of insecurity, of not knowing where I'll be in a few months time. I just want to love what I study, to wake up in the morning and be down to learn.
I'm the first one out of my family and friends to go to uni.. I don't really have anyone to ask/confide/discuss this with. What are your thoughts?
Thanks!!!
M.
submitted by GoldenBella to college [link] [comments]

Aspects of Game Awareness in Competitive Counter Strike

I wrote this for my friends who are either stuck in lower skill groups or are relatively new to the game and have low amount of experience in counter strike. Just thought I will share it on this sub-reddit too, in case it might help someone. This is my personal opinion based on thousands of hours playing and learning about this game from as many good resources as possible. I reached supreme as my highest rank in soloq for what its worth (not much) and I don't claim to be an expert so feel free to correct me, if I may be mistaken about something. Overall I feel these are the the very fundamental non-mechanical aspects of the game that lower ranks and newer players struggle with the most. Hope it helps someone. Thanks
Know the difference between team deathmatch and counter strike. The objective in deathmatch is to kill as many people as possible and avoid getting killed as much as possible. The objective in counter strike is to plant the bomb and defend it from getting defused as T. As ct your objective is to stop the bomb from getting planted and defusing it in time, if it does get planted. In counter strike "kills" are only a means to an end, not an end in itself. In other words, kills are beneficial if they help you to achieve your objective. In most other cases, they are meaningless. The game will reward your team with a point if you successfully complete the objective, it is blind to everything else that is happening in the round. You can flick one tap a guy across the map. The game does not care. Your team still has zero points unless that kill wins you the round or helps in doing so.
Counter strike is played at two levels. The micro-level which is you, your cross-hair, and what you see on your screen and your micro-level mind games with a specific individual from the enemy team. And the macro-level, which is kind of a game of chess and rock/papescissors both at the same time where 10 players are moving dynamically across the map and reacting and responding to events in the game. Every player MUST always be aware of the status of the macro-level game at any point in the round. That is to say, you need to be aware of the location of your teammates, known enemy positions, possible/expected enemy positions as well as any other relevant info you get or is relayed to you during the course of the round. This should be second-nature, you kind of do it sub-consciously. For this you need to learn to quickly glance at the map, every few seconds, and stay alert to absorb any info provided from team comms. This is a necessary and important skill you must master. You need to do this at all times, everyone does that, and there are no excuses for not doing it. Based on all this information, you form a mental picture of how the round is developing and you can then ask yourself the question, given the available information, what can I as an individual and/or my team as a collective do at this point in time, which will give my team the best possible chaance of winning the round while taking the minimising the amount of riisk tasken. Notice that there is no mention of kills in all of this. Kills are helpful only if they are necessary to execute the plan that you formed with your team.
While we are on that subject, all kills are not created equal. Mowing down five guys with glocks will show 5 kills next to your name on the scoreboard, but your teammate who went to bombsite A and one tapped the awper which gave you control of the site and most likely the round, has 1 kill which is 10 times more important and valuable then your easy five kills. Any decent observer of the game, will ignore your 5 anti-eco kills. Also contrary to popular opinion just because you got the most kills in a round or even the most kills during the game does not mean your kills were the most valuable or you had the the biggest contribution in winning the round/game. You as a player will be judged on how well you did YOUR role in the context of a specific round. Did you make the right decisions based on the information available to you, in that round at that point? Did you hit the shots you were "supposed to hit" and win the duels you were supposed to win? Yes? You have an A grade, congratulations. Did you go above and beyond that? You have a distinction.
If you are not the guy being setup for kills or the enemy generally do not attack your site, you will not have a high amount of kills, no matter how good your aim is, or how good you are individually. Bottom line, know what the scoreboard can tell about the performance of the players and what it cannot tell, and use it accordingly. Last example, your teammate got the entry and you killed 2 people camping in post-plant when they did not know where you are or they were fighting your teammates and you shot them in the back. His one kill is more important then your 2 kills. Enough said on people's obsession with kills.
ALWAYS play to win the round. All good counter strike players play and do whatever is necessary to win the round, while taking on the minimal riisk possible. All bad counter strike players, play for kills and whine about getting baited or dieing, or brag about their kills if they are doing well in that department. It is a team game, you win and lose as a team. If running with your kniife out and dieing will give your team the best possible chaance of winning the round, be fearless in doing so, and have zero hesitation in following the optimal course of action. You can have 5 kills in a round and still lose the round, and in that case, no one cares about your 5 kills. On the other hand, you can have zero kills and still win the round for your team. For example, by having a great read, baiting for your teammate, throwing a great flash etc. etc.
The round is dynamic and constantly evolving over time. You need to be able to adjust and adopt at the drop of a dime, as everything will not always go according to your initial plan, teammates may die, other team may make an unexpected move, someone may fail a smoke, etc etc. So you need to constantly analyse the state of the round as of that moment, and make the best possible play which will give you the best chaance of winning the round while taking the least amount of riisk. For example, you plan to execute on B at start of the round out of spawn. You move 5 towards B and see 4 CTs rushing towards you from B site, don't be stubborn and dumb and say we are still going B come hell or high-water. You abort your initial plan, because as of that moment, given the information available to you, it is not the optimal plan and you take the path of least resistance and go A.
Most outcomes of rounds are decided based on which team makes the best mid-round decisions. You (mostly) default as T and gather information. Some early round kills may be exchanged and other stuff may happen. And both sides are left with some sort of X vs X situation. 5 vs 4, 2 vs 3, 3 vs 4 etc. etc. The side which plays this situation the best while working on their strengths and shielding their weakness will win the round. In order to do this you need to be able to react fast, extremely fast, to events and situations arising in-game, a window of opportunity may open just for a second, if you as an individual and your team as a collective are able seize that opportunity you will stand as victors, if you are too slow and indecisive, that window will be long gone, and you are back to square one.
Take initiative when it is needed. If you pushing long as T on dust 2, and no one is smoking/flashing CT or holding the push through CT smoke and you are further back, take initiative and hold the goddam smoke, and call to your team, ct smoke is held so they have one less thing to worry about and they can focus on the site. Plug holes, which are not plugged. And be alert enough to recognise things which no one is attending to. Be alert and respond quickly to what your teammate is saying/asking from you. Keep the information processing time of your brain as low as possible. You don't need to be TOLD everything, use your own brain as well. If someone is not holding a choke point, hold the god-dam angle and call it. also play with your team and listen to your teammates at all times. Team-play plus Tactics plus Playing smart will always win over individual skill, in a large majority of cases, even at the highest level. That is how the game is designed with the low time to kill damage model, one man is not supposed to get more then 1 kill, or 2 on a good day. Anything more is a mega bonus. Individual skill can win you rounds here and there but it is teamplay and tactics which win you the game.
Know your role in the round, no one is going to explicitly state your role, in a pug environment, you need to have enough game sense to understand what your best role would be given your position and place in the round. This is not team cs, you need to be able to improvise on the spot. If you are hitting a site as a team and you happen to be at the front of the pack. No prizes for guessing your job is to entry. Good players will judge you on how well you did "your job" and not how many kills you get. As an entry 90 percent of the time you will die and that is expected. If you get one kill you have done great, if you get 2, you are a God. But that is not your job. Your job is to run in fearlessly, be as hard to hit as possible, and a) create space for your team b) give fast, accurate, useful and concise info about the enemy positions/guns/damage status so that your teammates have the best possible chaance of trading you. If you run in and die but gave great info and make space for your team, you have done your job. Your marks are 10 out of 10 for your role in that round.
When you hit a site as a team, key buzzword is TRADE, TRADE, TRADE and then play the post-plant intelligently. That can only happen if people do their role. Entry runs in like a maniac, and gives info and people following him, should have proper spacing with the entry and also amongst themselves. If you are too far apart, and run in one by one, you will all die against any good player. If you are too close, you will still die and get mowed down by one guy. You need to have the appropriate spacing so that you are able to swing just as the the enemy is shooting or done shooting your teammate and his recoil has not reset. So you move in when he is most vulnerable and kill him boom. This is a good bait. And that is your job if you are behind the entry. You are the baiter, it is not a derogatory term, it is your role. In-fact if you do not bait correctly and ensure the kill, you have not done your job and you are bad at your role. you NEED to do it well/correctly if your team wants to win.
Always play as a team, and with your team. If someone suggests something play with him and listen to him, if you can't do that for whatever reason or you have a bettter plan, then say so clearly and loudly so there is no confusion. If someone asks for a flash, that flash needs to come in the next 2 seconds, not 10 hours from now. Also it is a good idea to say "flash" when you throw the flash and "bang" when it pops so your teammate does not get confused distinguishing between your flash and enemy flashes and other random noise/chaos and peek at wrong time or get blind by enemy flash or even your own flash. Last but not least, remember the objective and keep the objective above everything else. If it means letting your teammate die, so be it, his life is not important. If completing the objective requires you to help your teammate, and dance in front of him with your kniife out and act as a meat shield, then that is what you do. You or your teammates are not the center of the universe. The only thing that matters is whether your team gets a point at the end of the round or not.
One final point about a common mistake that many people make, do not judge or justify how good a decision is by its outcome. By the same token, a good decision does not become bad by an unfavourable outcome. That's dumb. You or your team can do something which is stupid as hell but still win the round, but that does not mean what you did was right. It just means you got lucky, or hit some amazing shots or your enemy fucked up. But no one would say you are a good cs player or you are a good cs team, despite the fact that the outcome was in your favour. As a basic and super simple example, lets say you have 3 players alive as a T and the enemy only has one. You go B as a group and see/hear that the lone CT is on bombsite B. You have to make a decision here whether you go back to A or go B. The criteria for the best decision is that "it should give your team the best possible chaance of winning the round while assuming the minimum amount of riisk". In this scenario, the correct answer, based on this criteria is to go back to A. You could go B and kill the guy on B, or trade him, and still win the round. But that will not make your bad decision good. It will still be a bad decision and any analyst or commentator will say that you are a bad team or a bad cs player for making that decision. This is because doing so was a riisk as there is a chaance, albeit a small one, that the CT kills all 3 and you lose the round. There is a fine line between stupidity and bravery, know the difference between the two. An analogy of this situation is that as the T if you go B, it is equivalent to betting that you will NOT get a SIX, if you roll a dice. Here getting a six represents the low probability that the enemy will kill all 3 of you. But there is still a SMALL RiISK that you MIGHT get a six, which is a riisk taken for no additional reward. So be smart and don't play dice, and do whatever is necessary to guarantee the round. It could be the case that you lose the round because of your stupidity and you get money fucked and lose the following rounds and maybe even lose the whole game. All this because of one dumb act of bravado. If there were 2 top tier pro teams playing a big tournament, and they were in the same situation as above, the Ts would never go B and always go A, because they put ensuring the objective above their egos and play good counter strike, based on sound principles. They don't do this because they are scared or pussies or they feel their aim is not good. They do this because they are not stupid. riisk taken for no reward is dumb and it does not make you a stud.
Long story short, in order to be consistent as a player and as a team, always take the path of least resistance, that minimises the riisk incurred in achieving your objective. This is not rocket science, most of the above is common sense, and that is how the whole world plays counter strike. These are the fundamentals and basics of the game, that a player at any level should understand and be familiar with.
Some Random Tid Bits
Rules for Rotation: Every site has an "anchor" player. If help is needed on the other site, he will stay put. He will only rotate if one of two conditions are met. Otherwise he will never rotate.
  1. Bomb is Down and your team has complete control over the bomb
  2. The bomb is spotted and the enemy team does not have enough time to go back to the other site.
Contrary to popular belief mere spotting of bomb is NOT sufficient condition for the anchor to rotate. Because the other team can run strategies where they show bomb on one site and have 1/2 guys lurking on the other site (or not). When your anchor rotates they kill him or let him go and have the site for free. And the bomb goes back to the other site. you most likely lose this round.
Your role as a CT player:
  1. Try to get advance info of enemy attack, in order to buy as much time for backup to rotate and assist in defending the site.
  2. If attack commences, delay and stall as long as possible with nades etc to buy time for back up to arrive so back up has a greater chaance to retake/defend the site and defuse the bomb in time.
  3. Once the enemies starts coming into the site, stand your ground and fight to your death. Don't run away (by running away I mean do not leave the site premises completely and give the site for free, but this is contextual, maybe you got a quick kill or two, you have the right to leave the site and use bettter numbers to retake, you are also ok to dance around obstacles within the site, and delay the plant for as long as possible by staying alive for as long as possible and taking a fight only when it is impossible to avoid). Also no one expects you to kill all 5 if the Ts hit your site. If you get 1, you did OKish, if you get 2 you did great. Anything more, and you are a God. If you are playing a retake setup on one site (usually a site which is easier to retake), it is OK to just spot for info and don't fight. Or just use your nades to stall without taking fights or riisking your life. If you get smoked off completely, it is OK to play retake in that situation as well, all this is contextual.
Communication: If you can't hear your team, or your teammates can't hear you, sort it out in advance or as soon as the issue is spotted. Don't mention it after the fact. Call numbers and call the bomb. You can also see the bomb on the map if your teammates see the bomb. So irrespective of his call of bomb, you should know when bomb is spotted, screaming "B, B , B" is not a good call, the more you progress through the ranks, the more these kind of calls will be punished heavily by the enemy. I will put my hand up and say I am guilty of this mistake as well (even though I am aware of it). Unless you call All "A" or All long, your teammates would know they need to watch out for any possible lurkers or flankers while they rotate to come to help you. Otherwise they can run with their kniife out, without any fear, to get to you as fast as possible. Calling numbers and calling bomb will also make you less vulnerable to fakes.
Final Thoughts: Be positive and respect all your teammates, irrespective of their ability in a video game. If you are bettter then someone, it does not give you license to be a dickhead. If you want respect, give respect. No matter how good you are, no one will respect you, if you act like an asshole. Know the difference between constructive and polite criticism, communicated in a respectful manner, so that the other person does not get offended and degrading a person for making mistakes or being bad at the game. It's OK to be bad at a video game, or be bad at anything else for that matter.
Also helpful tips or identification of mistakes, here and there, is good, but don't bombard people with so much feedback that they feel overwhelmed. Or fear that every single time they fuck up even slightly 4 people will laugh at them or yell in their ears that they suck. In such a case, they will get up-tight and play nervous. They will also lose all confidence and second-guess every single move they make. More likely then not they will play even worse then how they normally do, and you will even lose any minor contribution you would have got from them. So its a lose-lose situation for all parties and this kind of behaviour will most definitely not help you to win more games of counter strike.
Expect people to play at their skill level, if someone is a lower skill level, he is going to play like a low-skill level player, this is expected and there should be no surprises. Moreover, he is most definitely not going to improve overnight or right in the middle of that game, right after your "live coaching".
If you are relying on such players to win the round for you, or play any role in winning the round, you will always be frustrated. As that is simply not going to happen. You are also putting undue pressure on him to do what he simply lacks the skill to do, mechanical or otherwise. Just provide moderate amount of guidance and for the most part let them do their thing and have fun. If they do something good, consider it a bonus., a Christmas present. If you follow this approach you will always be pleased by how they are playing, and they will also have a bettter time in game.
TLDR: If you can take away just one thing from all this, be continuously obsessed with one question and one question only (both as an individual and as a team) and that question is "how are we winning this god-dam round?" If you can articulate an answer to this question that you can explain to your little brother or little sister, with regards to the logic of HOW and WHY your plan would work, you will automatically become twice the player and twice the team you are. I can guarantee this much.
It is a useful exercise to unbind the scoreboard key, there is nothing of value in the scoreboard while you are in game. Scoreboard is a reflection (and in many cases an inaccurate reflection) of what happened in the past. It is only a distraction and takes your mind off the present moment. In 90 percent of the cases, the scoreboard is of little benefit while in game and in a high number of cases obsessing over the scoreboard will have a detrimental effect on your and your team's performance. Your job is to focus on the present moment and the current round. Each round is an independent event (not exactly but it is a useful approximation for the current context). If you did well in the past, you may play overconfident, overextend or do something stupid and cause your team to lose the current round.
If you did badly in the past, you may hesitate to make the right move because you lost confidence or you start playing scared. Most likely this will have a snowball effect, and you will under perform for the rest of the game, in general. What happened in the past is gone. It cannot be changed. Focus on the controllables and the only thing within your control is the best decision and the best action you can take, in the present moment, that will help your team to win the current round. This is also a useful life lesson.
Thanks
Post Script: The reason why I went out of my way to distinguish between killing enemies and the ultimate objective is because there can be scenarios where these two things can stand in contradiction. I wanted to focus on the more cerebral and non-mechanical aspects of the game in this guide. As I see lower ranks either make kills the ultimate objective OR have difficulty in recognising scenarios where going for kills might actually undermine or lower the chances of achieving your objective.
Counter strike is a multi-faceted game and there are many components to a skill-set of a good cs team and a good cs player and the ability to kill is just one of them. It is certainly a very important component but there are many other components which are equally as important, and still others which might be argued to be even more important, especially when a baseline level of mechanical skill has been achieved. One would be well served as a player by developing those skills, in addition to your aim, if your goals is to get better at the game.
Thus I am not saying that killing enemies is useless or unimportant. I do not wish to understate its importance but I also wanted to make sure that I do not overstate its importance either. When push comes to shove, in a great majority of rounds, some enemies may have to be killed in order to secure a win. Armed enemy players are a significant obstacle to meeting your objective. So generally speaking, the lower the number of enemy players alive the easier it will be for you to complete your task.
So please keep what I said in the right perspective and understand the reasons for me to word things the way I did. As long as you put killing enemies in its appropriate role as a "means to an end" and NOT an end itself. You should be good to go.
submitted by oceandream121 to LearnCSGO [link] [comments]

Advice for how to land a coding web development job in months?

Hi All,
I'm a 35 year old physics major in his junior year who's looking at coding/programming to build financial security and fund the rest of my undergrad. I've essentially decided to devote my free time outside of Summer classes and PT work (24 hrs/week) to learning HTML, JavaScript, and CSS, with the idea of building a good portfolio and landing a decent web development job (ideally, in 3 - 4 months). If I can do this, I might take a break from school and save money to fund the rest of my degree, or at most take a class or two at a time while working. A lifelong experienced programmer I know said "learn HTML, JavaScript, and CSS, and you can be making $30/hr within 3 months. Learn Python well and you could make 90k/year within 6 months." I have a number of ideas already, and am certain I can build a few interesting and well constructed sites for a good portfolio.
I'm going to seek out 'mentors' and friends who code & program professionally to bounce ideas off of and study with. I don't have money for bootcamps (I've heard Bloc is a huge sham), so I'm on Codecademy learning HTML, and will go into JavaScript and CSS next. Eventually I'll learn Python because (I hear) it's used ubiquitously in physics for problem solving and big data. I'm not learning it at the moment though, because it seems programming jobs are (more often than coding) requiring of CS degrees and professional experience, whereas web development jobs can be had with no degree, a strong portfolio, and a good interview.
My question to you all is, how can I best go about this? What are interviewers looking for? Do you have any studying recommendations? I hear people saying things like "use Codecademy and Treehouse in tandem", "FreeCodeCamp is better", "Paid for BootCamps are the best bet", and many other opinions. I feel like it's similar to comparing golf clubs. It's more about who's playing.
Any insight or experience would be greatly appreciated!
submitted by astroboulderer to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

Study What You Enjoy, Build Skills Instead

I recently posted on another thread and a very kind commenter (thanks chanoanderson!) suggested that I make a full post about the subject of choosing a major. Considering that I’ve gotten more comment karma off that one rant alone than many of my previous posts, I figured it could be worth a shot.
Why Listen to Me
I’ve helped dozens of students apply to universities overseas, and with a handful of exceptions, you have to declare a field of study as a part of your application. Therefore, knowing what to study is crucial. I’ve got years of experience helping even the most indecisive figure out what they want to do. Additionally, as a part of my day job of advising companies about how to best do business in very specific parts of the world, I’ve had a lot of candid conversations about what employers actually want. Why do they talk to me about it? Probably because they look on LinkedIn and see that I do this as well as the other, and they’re always happy to talk about their university days. Regardless, this advice comes from some of the top finance, consulting, and multinational companies around the world. I’m not claiming to be this guy when it comes to understanding what moves the wealthy, but I’d be lying if I said I didn’t have a few CEOs in my Contacts. Or the past four years of sporadic posts (what can I say, I like email more than Reddit) has been a fraud for fake internet points. Stranger things have happened.
The Key to It All
If you want to read a tl;dr right now, take this one piece of advice with you: major in something difficult that you love. If we go back to the entire point of education, the idea is to teach you how to think. Being able to understand ‘why’ is crucial, and ‘how’ is right behind it. Any good major will give you the tools to be able to think critically. For a scientist, it’s being able to understand how shifts in temperature may impact how rock formations form that ultimately lead to where oil or gas deposits may exist. For a historian, it may be seeing how the consolidation of China in the East led to the Great Migration that endangered the Romans in the West. In a world where conclusions are drawn by most faster than you can tap ‘like,’ that’s a rare talent. Of course, thinking critically involves being able to use both words and numbers to make your point, as well as being able to draw on the latest tools to do the job, and be able to sound like they know what they’re doing when they are in front of someone that they are selling something to. We’ll come back to that sales idea in a minute, but for now, let’s look at words and numbers and how it can relate to our choice of major. While a noted douchecanoe in later life, James Watson was part of the team that published on the structure of DNA. Read the article. It’s less than two pages, but it is beautiful in that it set out to explain something clearly. If you did pretty good in AP Bio and Chem, you’ll be able to get the gist. That ability to write something clearly and plainly is a real talent, and, frankly, something STEM programs need to focus on more. Now consider Florence Nightingale, who was in many ways the mother of modern nursing. She figured out that preventable deaths were killing more people than actual battle in the Crimean War, so she drew on a way to artistically represent that data in such a way would speak to the masses in London. Despite it being very numeric, she created one of the world’s first infographics to attempt to sell the British people on the need for more nursing support. It worked brilliantly. My point in this is that a balance is best. We’ll talk more about it soon, but being able to communicate those really advanced ideas and make them accessible is THE skill that employers (and investors) want in the next fifty years. One other thing. A truth I learned too late in life is that everything is, at some point or another, about sales. After all, you have to convince someone of the value of your work, whether it is a used car or an interview at a government agency. Shoot, even dating is sales, and in the interests of keeping this PG, that’s all I’m going to say on that subject. To a great degree, charm matters. Study something that makes your face light up when you talk about it. If nothing does that yet, keep looking. Now let’s dig in a bit deeper.
STEM Vs. Humanities
There is the false idea that you have to choose one or the other between STEM and humanities, and nothing could be further from the truth. Even for my clients who have to choose one or the other, we find a way to make sure that they are increasing their skills in the other, be it through clubs, personal interests, or any other method. As I mentioned earlier, the ability to combine the humanities with STEM findings is crucial As someone in STEM, it is not enough to do research or figure out the solution to a problem. Instead, you’ve got to show that it is useful knowledge and be able to communicate that to others. Watson and Crick would not be remembered today had they not written their conclusions so succinctly (and I bet there may well be a war in the comments about if they deserve to be remembered at all, and that’s fair). Nightingale would have been another nurse had she not created such a stunning way to explain her observations. As someone in STEM, you must be able to write clearly and present data in a memorable, easy to digest way. Lest you humanities people start thinking that I’ve forgotten you, don’t worry, I haven’t. You absolutely need to know how to leverage technology in order to explain and enhance your work. And technology is changing the humanities in a rapid way. Thirty years ago, the idea that academic journals could be accessed from your phone was unimaginable; now you can search JSTOR from most college libraries’ websites. It’s not just technology, however. An understanding of science and math are helping us to better understand previous cultures; we finally figured out that the beer that the Egyptians drank when building the Pyramids had some pretty powerful antibacterial compounds floating around it. Classical Indian archaeological sites make sense when viewed as mathematical apparatuses. Big Data even helped us figure out that Shakespeare co-authored some of his most famous works. Simply put, you’ve got to have skills from both.
Developing Skills
But what are those skills? We’ve already alluded to critical thinking, which is by far the most important. There are others worth mentioning.
STEM Example
One of my best friends happens to be a well-known physician. He’s no Sanjay Gupta, but he’s been interviewed on network news enough for his mother to no longer post it on Facebook every time it happens. Here’s how he did that. He majored in biology, but minored in history, because he knew he wanted to prove that he could write. Also, because of AP classes, it only took him three courses in college. He had learned French passably well in high school, but kept it up while traveling abroad. Since then, he’s added enough Spanish to be able to say ‘don’t eat that.’ He sought out opportunities to work on his presentation skills, ending up as an officer in our fraternity, which meant that he had to speak in front of less than interested crowds frequently; apparently it's great prep for medical conferences. By the end of undergrad, he had offers from plenty of top med schools, and had been recruited to be Deputy Chief Science Officer at a healthcare startup.
Humanities Example
The humanities side is a bit trickier, so I’ll use my buddy who studied Classical Studies. He found a loophole so he only had to take a year of Latin, but then kept up with Spanish, continuing his studies in the latter from high school. As a Classics major, he was writing a lot of the time, and having to give presentations on what he was writing about. Meanwhile, like I mentioned in the original post, he hated pre-calc, so he took a stats class instead, and learned to write HTML/CSS because he wanted to maintain our fraternity website. And he definitely took advantage of opportunities to travel. Like I mentioned earlier, he’s one of the most successful guys I know.
Majors to Avoid
Major in something hard that you love. If that happens with CS, then great! Take a loop, array, and fourspace/tab into happiness! If it happens to be anthropology or economics or even sociology, awesome! Get your hands dirty with bones, butter and guns, or (messiest of all) relationships! Just make sure it is something that is going to build analytical skills. A big issue no one wants to point out is that there are more majors available at lower-tier schools than there are at elite universities. Oxford has ~35 different undergraduate degree choices, not including combinations, and they don’t offer undergraduate business administration degrees (though management is offered as a combination with economics - that said, most Oxford grads who want to go into making enormous amounts of money study PPE, because it teaches them out to think.) Likewise, while you can study economics or applied math at Harvard College, you can’t concentrate in business. Even Wharton, perhaps the most famous undergrad business program in the US, still focuses on building these same skills. You’re just going to build them on your own. Compare that to all these places offering degrees in communications, healthcare management, or the like. Those are siloing you into a particular field, which if you know you want to be in that field, that’s great. However, there’s a reason that the internet is full of memes about communications majors. It’s not that it's impossible to jump into a different career with those fields, but you’ll end up having to talk up your transferable skills, which with this advice, you’ve been doing since day one anyway. Finally, a cautionary tale. If you still want to be a STEM major for the money, make sure that you’re ready. A lot (by no means all) programs want to weed out those who can’t hang. Not every Intro to CS class is as masterfully taught as CS50 at Harvard. Organic chemistry can be traumatizing. If you want to challenge yourself, that’s great, just be sure that you know what you’re getting yourself into.
Through all this, there is one other factor that matters, and that’s you. For each example I gave above, there’s someone else who didn’t go out and get what they wanted. They didn’t network, they didn’t hustle, they expected everything to be handed to them on a silver plate. That won’t cut it. College majors, as with all things, give you back what you put into them.
Edit: Formatting on bullet points.
submitted by Aneducationabroad to ApplyingToCollege [link] [comments]

Blunt Resume Advice for Recent Graduates in Technical Fields

I have reviewed a lot of resumes over the past several years. I have had more than my fair share of jobs in the technology industry where I have been both a job applicant and hiring manager. In recent years I have returned to academia where I get to help students prepare for that job market. I keep seeing the same missteps and offering the same advice on the matter so I thought I would right this up. ADMINS feel free to pin.
Now as a disclaimer before I begin. I am speaking ONLY about my experience in the Computing technology sector (Finance, Pharma, Telecom, and Marketing). Much of this will probably apply to similar or adjacent fields. Design or office administration jobs probably none of it.
EDIT: This is LONG. Be sure to have your resume handy when you go through it so you can edit as you go. Stick around for the end where I added a sample technical resume.
TL;DR: Think like a hiring manager, focus on what they want to see. You are ultimately going to be a cog in a machine for the first few years so leave off all of the fluff. Be clear, concise and focused. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE SKILLS.

Objectives / Summary

Let me begin by addressing my biggest pet peeve: Objectives. I don’t know who keeps recommending this for resumes for anyone other than Vice President or “C” level executives. Your objective is irrelevant to the company. Your objective is to do whatever you are asked to do in order to get the job. Your objective is to be the best damned cog in the machine as you can be because that is what you are being hired to be. No one cares what the Cog wants to achieve in this role. There will come a time when it is more important. Your first post-college job is not it. Sorry, not sorry.

Education

If you graduate in an off month (Not may or june) then don’t list the month, people assume the worst. "BUT ProfessorOfLies, I had a really good reason for taking that extra semester!" It was because of my [internship|pandemic|family emergency|Early Graduation|Whatever]. It doesn’t matter. Anything you need to explain on your resume, you will never get a chance to.
Don’t list GPA unless over 3.5. Know what it is. If an employer asks then answer truthfully, but do not volunteer it.
Associates Degrees are made irrelevant by your bachelors degree IF it is in the same field. IE: your BCC degree in CS is no longer worth mentioning after your CS degree from NJIT/Rutgers/Steven’s. Now you got your associate degree in MATH and then a Bachelors in CS. YES advertise that!

Skills

Skills are the most important part of your resume. Some people might say work experience but the things that are important from your work experience are the SKILLS you applied and learned while on the job. What any hiring manager wants to see is if the applicant can fit the hole in their team. They need a set of skills to get a job done and they want to get the best candidate that they can with those skills. So make sure your skills are right near the top of your resume. Make sure every project and job you have had reinforces those skills. Your resume should say “I have these skills and LOOK at all the ways I have demonstrated that I have these skills!”
To that effect I would suggest making sure your skills section is easy to read and categorized for convenient skimming. For example:
SKILLS
Programming Languages: C/C++, Java, C#
Scripting Languages: HTML/CSS/Javascript, PHP, Python, Perl, BASH
System Administration: Windows (Server, 10, 7), Linux (RedHat, Fedora, Gentoo, Ubuntu), Solaris
Database Administration: MySQL, SQLite, Oracle, MangoDB
Project Management: JIRA, Trello, Git, AGILE, SCRUM
Skills should be listed from MOST proficient to least proficient. In general for a technical resume I would shy away from using qualifying language. Proficient in, experienced with, once read about it in a textbook, etc. The reality is that if you put it on your resume you better be at least proficient in it enough to answer interview questions about it. Google interview questions for each skill you list. Make sure you are prepared to answer them. If you are not then don’t list them, if you are close then STUDY until you are prepared.
Read through job sites. Technology evolves constantly. Buzzwords change. New things become popular. Classwork doesn’t always make it clear what things you do in class are worth mentioning and which are not. So read through the job descriptions. Take note of the skills that they are looking for. Perhaps you have some but didn’t mention them in your resume because you thought that it wasn't relevant. Maybe you had it down, but described it in a different or outdated way. Adapt the resume to the job description (BUT DON’T LIE).
Human languages (as opposed to programming languages) DO require qualifying language. Having taken a French class in high school is not the same as a native speaker. Being fluent in a language means more than a casual speaker. If you mention a language make sure you list your level in the language. It may actually help if you are applying for a company that has business dealings in different languages.
NOTE: IF you mention a non-English language, be sure to mention English and your level in it. You may think that English is a given, it is not. People will also assume that if you know another language that your English skills are probably poor. So PLEASE remember to list English and your level in it. Especially if you grew up in a bilingual household.
EDIT: I don't want to forget to mention that if you come from a technical field you do NOT need to mention Office as a skill. That is a muggle skill, we are better than that.

Work Experience

Work experience can be a tough one for a college student. Not everyone can get or afford to take an internship or co-op. Sometimes your work is hard to justify on your resume. There is pressure to list every job you have ever had, but the reality is that it is just not necessary.
If you have had a string of retail / clerk jobs, you really don’t have to show them all. Pick the most recent one to list. IF you managed to do anything related to the field (Helped with the company website for instance) then list that as a bullet, but do not feel the need to go into detail about it. We all know what hell you go through. The only purpose this serves is to show employers that yes indeed you can hold a job.
For each job you held you want to list the standard information in the top line for it: Company, Title, Location, Dates (year - year is fine unless you NEED to be more granular because you worked a few in the same year). Then a BRIEF one line description of the role. You can even leave it off if you are doing that clerk job (Sales Associate at BLAH).
Then you want to list 2 or 3 bullets about your SPECIFIC accomplishments while in that role. Resist the urge to go through ALL the responsibilities you had in the role. Yes there is paperwork and teamwork and meetings and documentation in every role. Those are not going to highlight your technical skills!
Example entry:
Back End Developer, South Hill Apparel Newark, NJ Summer 2019
Supported and developed new features for the remote procedure calls for retail websites.
Note how each bullet mentions what the achievement was and then name drops the technical skills used in the process. This will now reinforce the assertion that your skills in Node.js, MYSQL, ZeroMQ, AWS, and Google Dart are legit.

Projects

Passion projects, Hackathon / Game Jam projects, and class projects are excellent things to put on the resume. Treat them like jobs (But make sure they are under the correct category) in formatting. Since few college students would have had relevant work experience you really want to focus on the projects section. This is something that I wish I knew when I was a recent graduate. I never had an internship but I had a TON of passion projects.
Not only will projects show that you have experience in the skills you are claiming, but it will also tell the employer that you are actually INTERESTED in the field you want to work in. That you will constantly be learning new skills and technologies that may benefit the company. Your projects will likely have exposed you to things not mentioned in the rest of the resume that could pay out in the future.

Professional Associations

If you belong to one of the industry related professional societies, be sure to list them. I am talking specifically about IEEE, ACM, IGDA, etc. For other extra curricular activities see the section below (Spoilers: DON’T list them). These will again show that you are serious about your interests in the field.

Conclusion

At this point I have gone over everything that SHOULD be in a resume (everything after Objective that is). As a new job seeker I would even recommend it be in that order:
Education, Skills, Work Experience, Projects, and Professional Associations. The minute you have that industry job though, Put Work Experience at the top and move Education to the bottom.
You may be wondering at this point that I left some things out. If you keep reading below "Additional Thoughts" you will see what I left out and why.

Additional Thoughts

One Page Resume

The one page resume is largely a thing of the past. When the most common way to get your resume in front of an employer was to attend a career fair or trade show, the one page resume made more sense. You basically need it to be your elevator pitch and no one at a busy fair wants to go through a long resume.
These days we mostly distribute resumes digitally (PLEASE USE PDF, not DOC) and the hiring managers will go through them in bulk when they have time to think. This doesn’t mean you should be sending out 5 page documents, ain’t no one got time to go through that. But if your resume goes over a page up to a full second page I would not worry.
Now Career fairs and trade shows ARE still a thing. So have a 1 page version of your resume with ample copies printed out when you attend these events. Do not be surprised if you hand a recruiter your resume, they read it for a minute and then go, “This looks great, here is my card. Email it to me” or “This looks great, here is the company job site, please apply and mention my name.” THEN when you send in your digital resume, send in the full resume.

Never Submit the same resume twice

EVERY time you apply for a job, look at the job posting. Match your resume as best as you can to the description. Use their language. Highlight the skills that they are looking for, cut down things that are not relevant to that specific job. Even if you apply to the same company more than once, each position should get a tailor made resume.
Hell make a MASTER resume with EVERYTHING you have ever done that might be relevant. And then cut it down to suit a job in question.

If you have to explain something, you will never get the chance

I mentioned this in the education section, but this bears repeating. The resume is a filter of sorts, so if something looks OFF, it will be thrown out. You may have an EXCELLENT reason for including something weird or off, but you will never get a chance to defend it. Just do yourself a favor and don’t put it on the resume. Maybe it will come up during the interview, and if so then you can give a full explanation and maybe the thing will work out for you.

Cover Letters

This is where you would put that fluff you wrote for your objective btw. But no one reads them. Even when they are required, no one actually reads them. Do you know when people read them? When you made a glaring mistake on them. Applying for a job at Prudential but accidentally mentioned how much you want to work for FedEx? Well you can bet someone WILL read it that time.
Write a good heartfelt cover letter for a job at a company that you really want to work for, and then adapt it to the job you are applying for. AND THEN PROOFREAD IT. I can’t stress this enough READ IT, adapt it, and make sure it makes sense because no one really cares what you wrote it in unless you made a HUGE careless mistake.

Github

Definitely have a github with examples of your work. Try to curate it to show your best, but a few old projects that were not great are fine and can show your growth. Finally public repos give programmers the ability to have a portfolio. Also try to make sure your username is sanitary. I can get away with EngineerOfLies because I have been in the industry long enough. You can't. At least not yet.

LinkedIn

Make sure you have a LinkedIn page and DO NOT TREAT IT LIKE FACEBOOK. LinkedIn is like your living resume. Treat it as such. Make sure it's up to date and leave your personal life and politics off of it.
And a side note: Make sure your FB is set to Friends only. You WILL be looked up on there. Sanitize it.

Relevant Courses

This is something that I see a lot on resumes from students. You are rightfully proud of the work you did in your undergraduate degree however, listing the courses doesn’t really help you on your resume. If you are being considered for a position then they will request your transcript and it will all be there. Before that though you need to show that you have the skills that they care about. “But ProfessorOfLies,” I hear you say, “I did some excellent relevant work in those courses!” And you are right, but the way to showcase that work is with the PROJECTS section. You can hone in on that one gem of a project you did in that class without mentioning the class title.
Note on class prefixes and numbers: Even when listing class work under the projects section DO NOT use the prefix and course numbers. NO ONE OUTSIDE YOUR UNIVERSITY KNOWS WHAT CS 345 IS! Hell most people IN your university won’t know what that is.
Note on class titles: Most course titles are generic and vague by design. When we propose a course we need to future proof ourselves. Technologies change all the time and even methodologies come and go. So when we make a course title and description we tend to make them generic enough to not require updating when technology does. Also these courses have to get through committees staffed by faculty from different departments. Sometimes interdepartmental politics will mutate a course title into something ridiculous because of some petty squabble. So when mentioning a class (under the projects section) use a DESCRIPTIVE title not the authentic one if the authentic one is weird. The actual title will be seen on your transcript.

Graphics

Just a reminder that all of this advice is for a technical resume. This may not apply to graphic designers, web designers, UX designers, Writers, Administrators, etc. With that said, DO NOT PUT GRAPHICS ON YOUR RESUME! You may think that logos may look nice or highlight the big name companies you interned for, but they are tacky and take up a ton of space on the page.
DO NOT get fancy with your templates either. Again, if you are not going for a design job you are FINE with just a drab easy to read resume.
DO NOT put your picture on the resume. That is what LinkedIn is for.

Extra Curriculars

Hobbies, clubs, student senate, Sports, eSports, fraternities and sororities please leave them off the resume. NO ONE CARES.
Follow up note on Frats and Sororities: DO NOT LIST THEM on your resume. You may have heard anecdotes about that one frat brother got the job because another brother was the hiring manager. Anecdotes are not data. The sad reality is that Frats have a bad reputation. To anyone who was not part of greek life you are seen as drunken party animals and sexual predators (I am not saying that all people in greek life are like that, I am saying that your reputation has painted it like that). Hell to people who were part of greek life that is how they are seen. Worse still, you know how Frats have rivals? What if the hiring manager was greek and from a rival frat, or at their school their chapter was a rival to your fraternity even if you had a good relationship with your local chapter? The best way to use your greek connection is to ask around from within your own organization and find out if the hiring manager is an older brother or sister. Barring that just wear a ring or something to the job interview. IF it comes up and you luck out it will be a huge bonus. If not, then it won’t hurt you.

Sample Resume

College Student Name

11111 Bleeker St Newark NJ 555 555-5555 github.com/baapsjfl;kasjdf;kjasdf;j LinkedIn link goes here

Education

New Jersey Institute of Technology
Bachelor of Science Information Technology (expected 2021)

Skills

System Administration: Linux (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS), Windows 10
Programming Languages: C / C++, Java, C#, Pascal, Fortran, Erlang
Libraries: STL, Boost, OpenGL, SDL, Glib, GTK, Qt, Web Sockets, BSD Sockets,MySQLi, RabbitMQ, AJAX
Scripting Languages: PHP, Python, Bash, HTML, CSS, Javascript
Database Administration: MySQL, NoSQL, MongoDB
Technologies: AMQP, RabbitMQ, Wordpress, Git, Apache2, Cron, SOAP, CURL, Trello

Work Experience

Sales Associate, Retail Giant Hometown, NJ 2018 - Present
Responsible for managing stock, orders from corporate, and large ticket items.

Projects

Front End Developer - Systems Integration Project Spring 2020
Project involved integrating a third party data source with a custom front end through a multiple server environment. I was responsible for Project Management, setting up the Front End server and implementing the third party api

Professional Associations

IEEE, ACM, IGDA
submitted by ProfessorOfLies to NJTech [link] [comments]

How to ACTUALLY learn CS

I want to preface this by saying this is not a get quick and learn programming post. This is how to actually, legitimately learn Computer Science, then Programming without wasting your money or time in the process.
I decided to start learning CS almost a year ago. When I first looked for resources I was overwhelmed by Udemy, OSSU, teachyourselfcs.com, etc. I tried an Udemy intro to programming class and requested my money back after 2 hours. The class wasn't going into the theory or the fundamentals or why to do things or how they work but was just someone reading steps and typing code. From my experience in college, I knew that lectures are great but you only truly know something by applying it to homework and project. Furthermore, College curriculums are designed to build up a foundation of fundamentals through progressively increasing the application of what you previously learned. Personal wealth is built through long term growth of compounding interest and dividends. There is no such thing as getting rich quick. The get rich quick internet stocks of the 2000s lost 90% of their value in a year. Similar to CS there is no 20-hour course that will teach you CS. Next.
With that said, I found OSSU open source CS degree with every topic from an accreditated university. Great! Too bad half the classes are decent at best for the reasons stated above and also the amount of time needed to complete them would have been like 3 years. Subpar return on my investment for a long time period. Pass.
This led me to a more succinct program https://teachyourselfcs.com/. I recommend reading the section on "Why learn CS". It validates my point about the online classes. So I bought the SICP book which is to CS as is Benjamin Graham is to value investing. Too bad this was written by an MIT professor but, to be frank, the examples were fucking hard. Without any online solutions bank, I found validating my work to be hard. This is probably one of the reasons I didn't go to MIT. I needed to find a more user-friendly resource that was easier and more engaging.
I didn't give up though. I decided to take the Hardvard CS50 class which from many online curriculums they recommend as the first class. The class was a nice refresher to the C++ class I took in college. I didn't do most of the homework but that was because I was using this class as an overview of "what can CS do". A primer as you may say. This class was helpful in teaching me what I don't know so that I could at least use the right terminology when googling my questions on stackoverflow. I learned a lot! This was not a coincidence since I was actually applying critical thinking but what I was learning was the application of CS, which most refer to as programming. Knowing how to connect to a database is great but you won't pass an interview if you don't know Big O notation and algorithms. So I stopped my project for the time being.
At about the same time I came across this yt video and Cal Berkly online CS classes. Coincidently, the author validates much of the same points I found over my journey up until this point. In order to actually learn CS work through the entire course of CS61A and then CS61B. You can goggle to find the previous semester's classes. I used their recommended curriculum and online directory of classes to find the course websites. Some classes have better resources than others but you can at the very least watch videos for topics like performance computer, AI, ML, Databases, Internet, Cyber Security, Networking, etc. I recommend just doing the two CS61 classes and then as needed, watch videos on other topics. For instance, I watched a handful of database classes and did some homework to understand them better.
Now once you at the very least finish the two CS61 classes you will be pretty prepared for entry-level computer software engineering interviews. Now go create a decent project and then practice for interviews through leetcode or any other website.
EDIT: A few people pointed out the How to Design Programs book as pointed out on teachyourselfcs.com I haven't been on that site in over a year so thank you for pointing it out. Since I never read the book I cannot talk about it. Cal Berkeley is a reputable university and I found CS61's projects, homeworks, and labs with automated tests very helpful and therefore I recommend them.
EDIT2: Computer Science is basically a runaway branch of mathematics. The more math you know the easier the logic will be to learn CS. Some people have pointed out not knowing algebra, or pre-calc so how can they do this course. For those people who do not have a strong STEM background I recommend finding some used math textbook on amazon and go through some of the sections. Khan Acedemy has great overviews of math concepts but to the same point at the Udemy courses without in-depth practice and critical thinking, you will not retain any of it.
EDIT3: I should have added this into the preface but just like personal finance there is no such thing as a get rich quick scheme. Similarly, there is no master CS quickly scheme. It's called a 4 year B.S. degree. My point of the post was to give advice on people looking where to actually learn CS and get a good foundation under them. This is not an exhaustive list because like mentioned you could spend 3 years on the OSSU courses and I bet 99% of the people who start that track don't finish it. IMO what I recommended is a realistic balance of hard time-consuming classes without overloading you on every elective under the sun.
TL;DR: Stop wasting your time on tutorials free or paid that faux you into thinking you actually know computer science. Take CS50, then CS61A, then CS61B, then go and apply your fundamental knowledge to create some project. Use leet code or anywhere else to reinforce your skills when preparing for interviews.
submitted by sat5344 to learnprogramming [link] [comments]

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