Amazon Affiliate Website with WordPress & Free Theme

FindItOnAmazon

Get help finding what you're looking for on Amazon!
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UpMySetup

The subreddit dedicated to improving your computer setups! Whether it be Mac, Windows, Linux or Console, submit your battlestations here for guidance from a dedicated community on how to pimp up your setup!
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Are there any free Wordpress blog themes that can post amazon affiliate links w/out upgrading to business to get plug-ins?

I want to test the waters in affiliate marketing but have no money to invest into it. I started a free blog on Wordpress and signed up for Amazon affiliates, but I can't post the affiliate link without upgrading to business to get a plug-in. Or are there some free themes that allow amazon affiliate links without a plug-in? Been trying to search online but hard to cut through all the noise out there.
submitted by Flapjack_Ace to Affiliatemarketing [link] [comments]

Free Amazon Affiliate Wordpress Theme

Here is the Free Amazon Affiliate Wordpress Theme.
If you’re looking for deals, coupon and promo codes, offers or discount sale for Amazon, this is the place. With Amazon, you can shop online from the world's biggest choice of books, apparel, furniture, movies, music and games, gadgets, PCs, toys, and additionally highlighting the majority of your most loved brands. Amazon has the greatest assortment and the least costs on almost anything you would shop online for. Clients appreciate the comfort of Amazon's one quit shopping background, and the quick and simple transportation from Amazon Prime. In the event that you have an Amazon Alexa, you can utilize voice directions to have Alexa pursuit, audit, and affirm your request for you. Alexa will peruse item names, costs and even gauge conveyance times. Alexa likewise utilizes your request history to enable you to restock the correct things you realize you cherish.
This is the complete link: http://www.pickedbox.com/coupon/amazon-coupon-code/
submitted by savebestcoupon to u/savebestcoupon [link] [comments]

I want a Shopify Store that just directs people to Amazon


Hey there,
We are a brand that has 2000+ products on Amazon. We've sold on Amazon for 8 years now. I'm wanting to build a store that just directs people to our Amazon store. I'm hoping Shopify can do this, I love their setup, and it really showcases our products. But I don't want to deal with "extra orders on Shopify" - I just want customers to click on the pretty picture and then buy it on Amazon.
How can I achieve this using Shopify?
submitted by theevilares to shopify [link] [comments]

Stream Guide for Beginners - Updated for 2020!

Hey Everyone,
I decided to update my previous guide on beginning on Twitch. Hopefully this is helpful!
It'll cover a large variety of topics, with a lot of suggestions based on my observations and professional experience streaming for my game studio. It is for anyone who plans to use OBS (or OBS variants), Xsplit is a different beast and I am unfamiliar with it. So before we begin, buckle up, put on your helmet, and get your travel mug cause we're going for a rip!

Creating Your Channel

  1. Coming Up With A Name: Like any product, you want something that is catchy, simple, and memorable. Also, for those who really want to roll with it, you can have a theme! Your name is important because it really sets you up for having solid branding for your channel. Some people just make a channel, and their username is something unoriginal or unattractive "Jdawg2245" or "bigchonkyboi22" or something along those lines. You are trying to diversify yourself in this highly competitive market, so give thought to your channel name because it sets the stage for a lot of future decisions. Think up something that rolls off the tongue and is easy for someone to remember if recommend. For example "JackDavies" or "PapaSmurf". Those are easy to remember and don't require memorizing what numbers or symbols were in there.
  2. Catch Phrases: It may sound silly, but catch phrases are pretty common for content creators. They create branding, and they create a sense of familiarity for fans/viewers to recognize a channel. CohhCarnage for example has his "Good Show!!" when he receives a sub, or for Ezekiel_III, he not only has a whole spiel, he also has a thing he does that is a unique fist bump for when he gets a new sub. When I sign off, I say "Catch ya on the flipside". It feels good to say and is distinctly me. Catch phrases aren't required, but it can build a sense of consistency and fun.
  3. Schedule: Before you stream, know when you plan to stream. This is important in order to provide a concrete, cut and dry, timeline of when you'll be online. This is important for viewer retention. Stream consistently for generating regular viewers as they can't come to watch, if there's nothing to watch! On the flip side, don't stream too much, or you'll burn yourself out, or have no new content. Keep it healthy, and keep it consistent. There are exceptions to this like Bikeman. He didn't have a schedule, he streamed when he streamed, and people would show up. That's an exception, not the norm.

Hardware

This is the most discussed part of streaming, each persons setup is unique, and it's difficult to say there is a perfect setup. What I'm going to do instead is explain to you the necessity of each component, and how it's critical to the stream and your viewers experience.
  1. CPU: The CPU (or Processor) is one of the most important aspects regarding the technical side of streaming. If you are using a 1 PC streaming setup, not only is it running the game, it is encoding your content as it broadcasts to Twitch (if using CPU b. What is Encoding? Encoding is the process of converting the media content that you are uploading (In this case audio-visual content) and converting it into a standard that Twitch will receive. Encoding is CPU intensive (uses a lot of CPU power) and this means you need a fairly decent CPU. I recommend some of the higher end CPUs in order to give yourself both sufficient processing power, and also some longevity. Buying an introductory processor will only mean you get a short time frame of which to utilize it. Higher end AMD/Intel processors will allow you to get the most for your money because even though it's $100 more, it may last another 2 years until needing to upgrade.
  2. GPU: Your GPU (or video card) is essential in running the games that you are playing. The two major players are AMD and nVidia. The better your GPU, the better your graphics will be, and the higher quality your stream will be because of how the game looks. Unless you're using the nVidia nvenc encoder, the GPU isn't super critical on the stream technical side of things, mainly just on the game side. If you are using NVENC, then your CPU doesn't have as much of a load which means more balanced. If you are playing via capture card and on a console, this will mean you can use either without concerns on how it impacts your
  3. RAM: Your RAM (or memory) is all about "short term memory", and the ABSOLUTE minimum I would recommend is 8GB, but I realistically, I recommend 16GB or more as Open World games and Battle Royale games are utilizing more RAM since they are temporarily storing data from servers in your RAM client side in order to display it on your machine as well as all of the visual assets you see. RAM significantly helps with multitasking as you start to run a few applications at the same time while you stream to help boost the quality of it.
  4. HDD/SSD: Your HDD (Hard Drive Disk) or SSD (Solid State Drive) are all about storage. SSD's are great for storing all your main programs and OS on, and running from there, and using a HDD for storing data is handy. HDD utilize mechanical components in order to run, therefore increasing the odds of fairly, so if your data is important to you, have a backup that is typically a bit larger than your current hard drive, in order to make sure ALL your content is backed up. SSD's use flash memory (the same as Thumb Drives, and this allows them to be faster, and more reliable, as the odds of mechanical failure are slim to none. If you are looking to edit your content on your computer, make sure to have a decent sized HDD so that you can record your stream as you stream it!
  5. Monitors: Monitors become your best friend as your stream grows. I currently use 2 monitors, although in the past I used to use three. I know right? I was insane! This allowed me to have the center monitor act as my main action monitor (the game I'm playing), my left monitor is my OBS screen so I can check my frames, uptime, and see any alerts that are broadcast (more on this later ;]), finally my right monitor was for my third party bot/chat which I now use Stream Elements for in OBS).
  6. Webcam: If you are deciding to use a webcam (some people stream without one, but it can help), it's worth getting a decent one right off the bat. A nice logitech webcam is around $100, but should last you for a couple years! The models I'd recommend are the Logitech C920/922 or the Logitech Brio (a 4k webcam). There are cheaper webcam, but you will notice changes in quality. I highly recommend at least something with 1080p and 30fps. A lot of the differences will be FoV (how wide of a shot it takes).
  7. Microphone: This is a more difficult decision. Each person has a different way they want to broadcast their audio to their viewers. Many just use a headset, and eventually upgrade to something else once they've established themselves. Others will use something with more umph right from the get go like a Razer Seiren, or a Blue Micophones - Yeti Mic. And even higher end people will use a digital audio input, a high end studio XLR microphone, and a scissor stand, to record professional quality sound, with more options for effects and the like. As a note, audio quality is a big deal. No one wants to listen to a rough sounding mic that sounds like it was bought for 10 bucks at the dollar store, so this is a good place to focus.
  8. Network: It is important that you have ~5mbps upload speed. This will allow you to upload at the recommended encoding bitrate of 2000kbps or higher. If you are playing an online game, while streaming, it's helpful to have a bit more speed to run. In a perfect world, a higher upload speeds means better quality for your stream if you can afford to increase the bit rate.
  9. Capture Card: for those of you who want to stream console games, a capture card is important. There are a variety of capture cards for old connections and for HDMI. You also have the option of internal or external capture devices. This will reduce the load on your PC as the processor or graphics card is being used just for encoding as the game is being played on the console. Search for the right capture card for you, and see how it goes! Elgato is a great brand for capture cards, as is AverMedia.
  10. Peripheral: This includes mice, keyboard, etc. This doesn't have a major impact on the stream, just get what you like and makes game-play more comfortable for you!

Setting Up OBS

  1. First, download OBS, this is the application that this guide is based off of, and while allow you to broad cast your stream to your twitch channel. There are some alternative OBS versions such as Streamlabs OBS, StreamElements has an addon for OBS, and Twitch has their BETA software, Twitch Studio.
  2. Second, follow the instructions to install OBS on your computer.
  3. Third, go to your Twitch Dashboard, go to Stream Key, and show your stream key. This is important for OBS to broadcast to your Twitch channel. Go to your OBS Settings-Broadcast Settings and input your stream key into the Play Path/Stream Key section, when you've set Mode to Live Stream, and Streaming Service to Twitch.
  4. Fourth, set your encoding bitrate. The golden rule for a non-partnered streamer is around 2000kbps for your Bitrate, but you can go higher, although without transcoding, you run the risk of some viewers having buffering issues. There are two encoding types, x264 (CPU Intensive) and NVENC (GPU intensive). Try testing both to see if you have any bottlenecks. I recently have switched to NVENC since I have been playing switch games, which means my GPU has more wiggle room and it's a bit higher end than my CPU.
  5. Fifth, set your video settings. The golden rule is 1280x720 (720P) with an FPS of 30. As your stream grows, you'll more likely get transcoding when capacity is available. If you are an affiliate, you will get priority access to transcoding for your viewers (the ability to set the resolution lower) as capacity is available, and as a partner, you will always have it.
  6. Sixth, set your Audio settings to how you like them (desktop audio device and what you want your default microphone to be). I personally have a higher quality, stereo microphone, so I force my Microphone to Mono.
  7. Seventh, start creating your scenes. There are two different squares you'll see. Scenes and Sources. Scenes are the unique scenes for say "Stream Starting", "Main Overlay", "BRB", "Stream Ending". Sources are the things that are added together to make a scene. This includes images for overlays, graphics, Browser Sources for alerts/notifications, Text, Webcam, etc. Scenes are very specific to each person, but I recommend checking other streams to see what is aesthetically pleasing to you. From there, you can either make them yourself, commission them, or you can use third party sources for scenes. As mentioned elsewhere, there are groups like Nerd or Die and Own3d.tv that sell overlays. Nerd or Die does have some pay what you want.
  8. Eighth, do a test stream. This is important for you to gauge if your quality settings are at the right place for you, and allows you to fine tune them.

Branding

  1. Logo: Your logo is your face. Find something professional, but at the same time catches the eye and helps draw a theme for you! You can check out certain sites like Fiverr to get a cheap starter logo without breaking the bank.
  2. Overlays: Whether you buy them online, have someone make them, or make them yourself, overlays help enhance your stream scene. Keep it simple, while still adding flair. Recently I removed some stuff from mine so there was more game space for what I am playing, while still displaying the same information for viewers regarding latest follower, donation, etc. There's a lot of Overlay sites such as Nerd or Die, Own3d.tv, and fiverr to get custom overlays. Find what works best for you.
  3. Information Panels: On your channel, you have information panels at the bottom. Use them to your advantage. I highly recommend having a schedule panel, links to your various social media, etc. Creating your own panels, that match your general theme, are worth it to create that Branding we are aiming for. You are the product, you don't want crappy packaging.
  4. Social Media: Try and match all your social media to your channel name. This breeds familiarity with all the folks you are networking with. They will recognize the name across all different social media platforms. Reddit, Twitch, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, etc. I use PhazePyre for everything.

Streaming! The Good Part!

This is going to be general tips to help you on your path to becoming a great entertainer. There's ALWAYS room for improvement, even the best streamers and entertainers have room for improvement
  1. Don't be quiet: Talk to your viewers, whether it's 0 or 100. Talk to yourself, talk about what your doing, talk about the song, it's awkward at first but as you do it more often, you'll get used to it. Not only will this provide content and dialogue, it'll help you workout your vocal cords so that you can talk for extended periods. The big thing is you don't want to come across as boring. One way to help with this is to add very light background music to the stream. It helps fill the silence a bit in quieter games.
  2. Minimize off screen time: Try and minimize the amount of AFK time that you have. If you are younger, let your parents know you are streaming. Explain to them what you're doing, and hopefully they understand. Let them know how long you'll usually stream for, and if they absolutely need something, to let you know before hand, or via a text message. Nothing is worse than Mom busting in telling you to take your underwear out of the bathroom.
  3. Don't play oversaturated games: Try to avoid what I call the "Top 4", LoL, Dota2, CS:GO, Hearthstone, unless you are REALLY good at those games. They are competitive games, and you are competing with professionals of those games and giant tournaments. This is tough though, as it can be tricky to be found. You'll have viewers coming in and out of your stream, and depending on how you're packaged yourself, they may opt to chat and become a follower. Additionally, there's no perfect game to play. Find something that you know you can play regularly and it'll help you build
  4. Don't call out lurkers: Don't even get your bots to do it. It's tacky, and WILL make most people leave. Some people just want to sit back and see how you are. Lurkers are especially great as they'll help build your viewer count so you can break above the 90% of streams that are under 5-10 viewers.
  5. Don't ask for donations: i don't think I need to really explain why.
  6. Be Confident!: People like seeing someone who's comfortable, confident, and knows what they are doing, or, if you don't, "Fake it 'til you make it!"
  7. Network, Network, Network: The best way to network imo, is to support other streamers, and organically support their endeavours. What do I mean by "organic"? I mean don't force it. Find streamers you actually like and enjoy, who are around your size, and show your support because you care about THEIR stream, not just yours. It's tough though as you don't want to come across as only wanting to interact for their viewership.
  8. Create Channel Competitions: These can breed fan loyalty and help turn people from lurkers to regulars and super engaged community members! Don't worry if you can't afford it though.

Bots (The Good Kind)

I'm only gonna list the major three free bots
  1. Nightbot: A free, web based bot, that provides moderation capabilities, song requests, and custom commands.
  2. MooBot: Similar to NightBot in that it is cloud based. Includes song requests and more.
  3. Streamlabs' Cloud Bot: If you are using StreamLabs OBS, this will be optional to enable while using it. Definitely worth it so all of your settings are in one client. Offers many options like moderation, commands, timers, giveaways, and more.

Security

Doxxing, Swatting, etc, are all bad things that trolls will do to cause trouble. These are some ways to reduce the risk of having your personal information leaked, and to help keep you safe. You may not be worried, which is fine, but I know many people are concerned about their identity and safety, and these are a few tips to help
  1. Create a separate email, that doesn't include your name anywhere. This will create a divide between you and your online persona. Batman doesn't go around telling everyone he's [REDACTED] does he?
  2. If creating a PayPal, upgrade to a business account, and make sure all your information is kept private. Your address may be displayed when you purchase things, but this will protect you when users pay you money and it displays your information. I recommend using the Name of "YOUR CHANNEL NAME's Twitch Channel".
  3. DON'T USE SKYPE WITH VIEWERS, heck unless you 100% trust random viewers, don't even use TeamSpeak. Discord is is a new app that secures your ip to prevents users from obtaining your ip address and causing problems.
  4. Don't give too many details out about your location, and if you invite friends/family (I recommend not doing that so that you create an independent identity) make sure they don't address you by your name. Get a PO Box if you'd like to send things to viewers without worrying about them get your personal details.
  5. Ensure your Steam Profile is changed to your new channel specific email. If you send a game to someone for a giveaway, it will show your personal email unless you change it.

How to grow your channel

  1. Make content on other platforms outside of Twitch. YouTube, TikTok, and other forms of content based social media are great ways to passively grow your audience. Find out your specialty and put that out there. YouTube content should try and be unique compared to what you do on stream in order
  2. Build a community. Get to know the people coming to your streams. If you value them, they will value you and feel wanted in your community. As a smaller streamer this is your strongest tool. I highly recommend making a discord and inviting people to join it. If you integrate Mee6 as your Discord bot, it will notify people when you go live if you'd like, and that can help build retention and viewership.
  3. Roll with the punches. You make get trolls, the best way to deal with them is don't take the bait. Although not super valuable, I've had some trolls follow because of how I rolled with their attempts to troll me. I never saw them again, but the less serious to take them, the better a time you'll have.

DO NOT DO THESE

  1. Don't do Follow for Follow. Followers doesn't mean much. You want a high conversion rate, and these bloat your followers and don't typically result in extra views. The goal is to have as many followers be viewers as possible, a 1:1 ratio. That person following you isn't likely to watch your stream. What do I mean by have as close to a 1:1 ratio as possible? You want to try and have every follow be a viewer. Is it realistic that if you have 25k followers, that you'll have 25k viewers? No, it's not. but what's realistic is to focus on converting every follower into a repeat viewer. Tools like Discord can help bring them into your fold. Some people will follow and only come back infrequently, but over time, you can work to have them become a regular. But if you do Follow 4 Follow, you'll have a bunch of followers who just want you to watch them, and aren't likely to be a regular viewer.
  2. Don't pay for viewers (view bots). It's bad, Twitch will find out, and you'll be hooped.
  3. SupportSmallStreamers, FollowForFollow, and other "growth" hashtags really aren't that great. Everyone is out for themselves. Rather, find like minded streamers and become friends with them. When you care about others, they'll care about you.
  4. Be wary of Affiliate programs (outside of Twitch) as they aren't super beneficial for anyone. Focus on growth to build your influence and viewership, from there revenue will naturally come and you can prepare via agents/agencies, and the like. For now, dedicate your time to building a community. Rather than affiliate programs, use things like Amazon Blacksmith and personally recommend what you want and get some kick back.
  5. Some small streamef4f groups can cause problems for you long term. Studios and companies will blacklist people that aren't focused on quality content creation, and instead are looking for instant fame. Usually it means the quality of your content isn't great, and your influence is not equal to your numbers.

Summary

All in all, streaming is a fun time. It's worth getting into especially if you're charismatic and love to entertain. Charisma is hard to develop for some people, and you may not succeed, that's the reality of things. Do what you can and don't burn yourself out. Additionally, find what makes you stand out in the crowd. Twitch continues to grow for streamers, so you need to stand out in a good way. A solid way to grow is by creating content on other platforms and pushing people to Twitch. Twitch doesn't have great passive growth opportunities, but other platforms do. Funnel those followers to Twitch and you'll see better growth.
This guide isn't all inclusive and covers everything. There is SO MUCH to cover, but this is a beginners guide and enough to give you some tips, hot takes, and instructions to start your journey on Twitch. I have made a previous post about 4 years ago that won some awards, and this is just updated a bit to make it more relevant to 2020 as I still see people reading my post and sending me emails. So here's something freshened up.

Suggestions?

Feel free to pm me, or leave a comment with any additional content you'd like added to this guide, or feel free to comment if you have additional questions and I'll add to the guide! You can DM if you have any questions regarding streaming or any additional inquiries specific to you and not in general! If you were paying attention to my guide, you should be able to find me on social pretty easy as well ;)
Good luck streamers, and have fun!
submitted by PhazePyre to Twitch [link] [comments]

A step-by-step guide of how I would build a SaaS company right now - part 2

This is part 2 of 5.
Part 1
LET'S DO THIS!
Big thank you to everyone that upvoted and commented on the last post.
I’m pumped, this is part 2 of 5 for those keeping track at home.
  1. Start with your revenue and monetization plan (are you targeting a sector that has money and can/will pay - Part 1)
  2. Align yourself with others in your space (cheapest way to get traction/credibility)
  3. Work on road mapping your product to align with what complements your partnerships (cheapest distribution)
  4. Work on building a marketing strategy that can help expose and align your brand while strengthening its recognition with your partners (will this make us both look good)
  5. Build customer advocates along the way, tell their stories (lead with examples)
Early traction, everyone wants it, very few people know how to do it effectively. Hell I’ve seen it all, run all the experiments, all the tests and I can tell you from experience if you have the patience, slow, steady, and surgical is the way to grow. Especially in the beginning.
In part one we spent a lot of time asking some basic fundamental business questions. Including, an exercise in the importance of being able to niche down.
We’re going to expand on the niching down because it’s how you gain clarity and find people to align yourself with early on.
The goal of this will be to understand:
  1. How to niche down
  2. How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
  3. How to position within that market
  4. How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
I’ve chosen to outline these in all our steps for niching down.
You’re going to see these steps move from research to market evaluation to list building stopping just short of outreach. We’ll touch on this in part 3.
Last week I took a call where someone told me their target market is males 25-45 that like sports.
This is the most important part of your entire business. I’m serious.
Let’s rock through this together so we can get you super focused and know where and how to spend your time and money.
(The below was laid out in part 1 and was the layered niching exercise)
LEVEL 1: We’re a helpdesk product.
How to niche down
The big question is “for who”?
So you’ve picked the type of product you are building and a use case, the problem is there are lots of people like you out there and this doesn’t tell me much about your market, it’s too broad.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
Because this is so broad, it’s impossible to actually target a market and without being able to do that, it’s not possible to recognize opportunities, there’s just too many of them.
How to position within that market
Competition is good and bad, but it’s always better to be a big fish in a little pond, the best way to reduce the size of your pond is to niche down as much as possible while still understanding a large enough TAM (total addressable market).
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
No wasted effort. Every idea, concept, must have a small goal attached to it.
It’s too expensive to try to be everything for everyone and when you take this approach you end up failing at doing any one thing well enough for people to switch.
Let’s build on this.
LEVEL 2: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies.
How to niche down
Pick an industry or trend that is on the rise - look towards a shift or something that relates to changes people are making in their daily routine.
In this case we picked eCommerce because it’s on track to hit over $7 Trillion worldwide this year and has steadily been increasing across all brands. So we have an industry with a large enough economic driver to let us start niching down.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
We now buy things online that we never would have thought to do so even just a few years ago. Amazon is selling Tiny Homes now, seriously, if you can buy it, odds are you can do it online. There are massive opportunities to bring goods and services to people through convenient online shopping. And with that increase they will all need a help desk platform to provide the best experience for their customers.
Customers today don’t want to speak with people, they want answers quickly and easily. It’s all about reducing friction.
How to position within that market
Narrow down within the market. eCommerce is a good starting point, there are different industries, subsets, and categories. Go narrower. Start thinking about where the friction exists in the industry and for what subsets.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
In the beginning, it’s going to be an uphill battle, picking the right trending industry will give you the best chance of success. Something that is rising up to the right in popularity is way easier to sell into than a trend that is declining.
Know your competitive landscape.
Everyone has a competitor, whether direct, partial, or mildly related. Spend a lot of time on understanding this and knowing that your product is part of a very large landscape or landscape of potential competitors. Any one of the existing partial or mildly related competitors may be building something to more directly compete with you down the road.
Practical advice
Most companies stop here and hope for the best.
Unfortunately, this isn’t a go to market plan or a sustainable business model.
There’s an important bit worth mentioning here as it will become a theme of this entire post.
Great products enhance workflows through features, the focus isn’t on the product but what the product enables people to do. Success in the software business is all about understanding existing workflows and simplifying the experience.
As you do this exercise to niche down ask yourself:
What does the current workflow look like?
What are they currently using?
How are they currently using it?
Where are the gaps?
What are the best practices for creating workflows?
Always seek to understand how your product works in a workflow - what role it plays, how it best optimizes - this is the data play referred to in Part 1.
What are the things that matter most to people in the eCommerce space?
That’s a lot of questions with even more answers, when you peel everything back it becomes very clear that it’s not possible to answer all of them without going deeper.
Too many people to talk to, too many industries, too much everything.
Let’s take a different approach - how I got to Shopify in the next niche down.
No successful new SaaS company today launches without an integration.
So let’s find an eCommerce platform to integrate with.
We have to look for a stable player that has an app store and is a market leader.
As a starting point, my goal is to be a help desk for ecommerce companies.
  1. I need a list of all eCommerce platforms
  2. I need to understand which help desks they already integrate with
  3. I need to understand what people like and don’t like about them
  4. I need to find out which platform is going to be the best fit for my product
There are lots of sources for this and even more articles, google and read.
If you’re looking for numbers though and data, use BuiltWith and run a search on the platforms after you have your list to figure out which is the most popular.
Ok so we have our list of eCommerce platforms, we’ve analyzed the data, made sure they tick all the boxes and we’ve run our reports and found that Shopify powers 1.2 million stores.
Let’s lock it in as our next step in niching down.
LEVEL 3: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify.
How to niche down
It’s more than just market size. Going with a market leader is always a safe bet but it also provides the most competition. Sometimes going with a smaller platform that doesn’t get all the attention is a worthwhile research project.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
There are two sides of the opportunity and this is something that I didn’t touch on in the original niching down. Shopify and BuiltWith categorize the types of stores that are on the platform, so you can niche down to a certain type of store, for example just cosmetics or just apparel.
The other side of the opportunity is putting together your list of companies currently operating in the ecosystem.
How to position within that market
Smart people are really good at collecting data and interpreting it.
Let’s get some data.
  1. Go to the shopify app store
  2. Type in “Support”
  3. Click paid on the left margin and click the “Support Category”
  4. Use something like Simple Scraper ( a great chrome plugin, no affiliation)
  5. Get your scrape on, this shows 87
  6. Time to get busy - categorize them
  7. Pick the ones most similar to your offerings
  8. Click on them, look at their reviews - all of them on shopify Scrape them
  9. Go to G2 and Capterra and look through all those reviews as well
  10. Put them all in a spreadsheet, read them all, highlight those that stand out
  11. Find the ones that are popular, others that have features people like etc.
  12. Document, and integrate the baseline features into a trello board on your product roadmap
  13. Take all the bad reviews and complaints - look for gaps that you can fill
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
So take a look above, we went from a bunch of questions to being able to do a ton of market research to do product research and understand the current market offerings and where we might be able to gain some ground and offer something people might be interested in and ARE PAYING FOR.
How do you stand out?
You need to have a workflow that is 10x better than a current competitor in the market with a strong roadmap that lays out how you intend on optimizing this workflow. Features are built to augment the workflow and simplify the work of your clients employees, less work, more data, better understanding.
Ok so we’ve narrowed it down to eCommerce and Shopify and we have a list of other products that are currently playing in the space. We’re now looking at workflow - let’s figure this bit out.
LEVEL 4: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation.
How to niche down
Add another variable - it doesn’t have to be Shipstation, but it’s a good example as for eCommerce you’re likely shipping products places. By adding another variable, we’re shrinking our population to target.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
The biggest problem for all companies these days is combining different one off services and getting them to play nicely together. Stand alone products usually outclass all in one products as stated above because the focus is better. This is generally always going to be where you can find a gap in the market as the integrating of products is an afterthought rather than something contemplated in the very beginning.
How do you decide on the technologies you want to work with?
How to position within that market
Don’t guess. Understand the workflow of an eCommerce company and how it relates to support. For instance, most support tickets relate to order status, tracking, and returns. These all involve the store, transaction, the service desk, and the shipping carrier. Look for ways to streamline the experience for the service rep - for instance if refunds require approval, build a system that allows for all those tickets to be queued up with an easy interface for approvals or different color tagging to allow for them to be easily sorted by type.
By focusing on two technologies you can start by creating a better visual collaboration between tools to improve overall experience.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
Stack the deck in your favor.
Focus on where you can drive early alignment between your product offering and the audiences of your now two products. When you reach out to both companies especially the smaller ones like a Shipstation, you can collect more information about who they are catering to, volumes etc.
Most companies have a partner program - look into connecting with the lead.
When the time is right you might even get a shoutout on their social or blog or you can decide to co-publish some research report together. Lots of options.
Let’s double down on what being niche allows us to do:
  1. Know our audience
  2. Research with purpose
  3. Personalize outreach with early feelers
  4. Better understand a realistic TAM (total addressable market)
  5. Understand overlap between products
  6. Early alignment with bigger names
This whole topic is about alignment, alignment with partners, customers, and your product.
We have a list of potential customers now, but we need to segment them down further.
LEVEL 5: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation that have less than 100 skus.
How to niche down
Why less than 100 skus?
This means they are small enough to try a new product. It also means you can see what works and what doesn’t work on a potentially smaller store. When you’re managing a store with more than 100 skus, things get a little complicated, it’s an arbitrary number but changing internal processes and workflows when you get to that level means that your staff is coming from a place of having used a system before that could handle the volume and trying out something newer or unproven is a tall order.
This process can be applied to anything, if your product does better project management look for people that run less than 20 projects at a time or projects that are less than 6 months, whatever it may be. We’re starting small.
Always default to the path of least resistance. Work smarter, not harder.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
I’m sure this could be automated, but in lieu of it being automated, you should start by manually figuring this out for yourself.
That list you have from BuiltWith that has urls, yeah we’re going to use that one.
Put the websites in the spreadsheet you downloaded, then create a new column and add “products” to the url - so you have the website in cell A, the word “products” in cell B then in blank cell C write “=CONCATENATE(A:B)” congratulations now you have cell C that will take you straight to the product page to see how many skus they have.
Update this hack doesn’t work on all shopify websites like I had hoped and after some research it seems like this is a bit of a struggle point for others as well.
I’m sure someone could write a script to scrape this information.
Go find an intern or hire someone to do all the lookups for you or find someone to write a script to automate the results - remember always work smart.
Run this and you’ll come up with your go to target list.
How to position within that market
The best helpdesk for stores on Shopify using shipstation with less than 100 skus - all of a sudden this starts to sound like something someone would almost search for. That’s the point.
We’re working our way down where it becomes a simple checklist if someone was searching for things.
Shopify - check
Shipstation - check
Built for smaller stores - check
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
Remember you’re not building a product for everyone yet, your goal is to dominate a niche. You can always expand from there.
So we’re about half way through and we have figured out our potential partners and now we’re working on narrowing down this customer list. Before we dive in and start reaching out we need to really understand who we’re targeting and we need to start small.
Let’s narrow this down even further.
LEVEL 6: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation that have less than 100 skus and do less than $10 million in annual revenue.
How to niche down
Why the less than $10 million in annual revenue? The only reason I would say this in the beginning is that they won’t have as much traffic and ticket volume, they make for better early clients, you can learn a lot more from their use cases and improve the product without worrying about something going wrong and a larger client really getting mad and churning. You also usually have greater access to work with their staff to improve your product.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
Unless you’re currently on the front lines, you need to find some early providers of feedback that are on the front lines. In essence, this is the starting point of a community and information play.
There aren’t a lot of data points available about companies in the early stages. People always have questions and there are limited resources in the early days, even across similar companies.
(Just look at reddit there are tons of repeat answers and questions.)
Someone answering tickets all day is the last person that wants to provide feedback, as much as they would like their job made easier, they don’t have the time.
How to position within that market
“But I need a big logo to let people know that I’m real.” You don’t, not in the beginning. All you need is a few good customers that are open to lending you the feedback you need to get better. A lot of smaller brands do a good job of branding, play the long game, find brands that are growing and try to get in early - grow with them.
Logo hunting has its place but you need to find product market fit before you can really make that happen.
By now you have probably figured out that whenever possible you should automate things. The way you do this is through data collection.
Using logic, math, and a spreadsheet you can do enough to be dangerous.
Use a service to figure out what their unique traffic is, take a look at their products and assume that their cart value is around 2-4 products per order then take the conversion rates by industry - you can find these online they are openly listed.
Your sheet will look something like this:
Company, Traffic, Conversion Percentage, Order Value, Sales Percentage, Revenue
eCommerce blended average is 2.2% - go use a spreadsheet and some formulas and bam you now have the revenue numbers. We’re not looking for exacts here, but more generally a good estimate.
I’ve actually run these numbers, if the products are sold through other channels, Amazon, retail, etc, then a rough estimate would be around ~33% of the revenue will come from the ecommerce store.
Factor in a range based on the size of the brand and it’s channels this should give you a rough estimate of the revenue even if they don’t publish it.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
Provide value - the most overhyped phrase but still true - the question then becomes, with something as subjective as “value” rather than just create, instead ask and create. This part is coming up, we’re almost ready to turn this on.
We’ve started to move from who are partners are to who are our potential customers. This is on purpose - my stance is that your first customers are really your partners and you should work on aligning yourself with those that are the best fit for your product.
You want your first clients to buy into your vision and invest the time to help shape it.
Ok on to the next -
LEVEL 7: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation that have less than 100 skus and do less than $10 million in annual revenue with support teams less than 5 people.
How to niche down
So now we’re getting into the easier stuff - this is just a simple LinkedIn Search - small teams are usually before the real deep process point, they are also really good at providing feedback on tools that can actually help them out.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
If you have less than 5 people on a team, it’s a small enough number to target the entire team - multi prong approach to product awareness.
For customer support they are often the least paid and they have the most stressful jobs - it’s an all around shitty position to be in, so if you can provide them joy, you’re going to make fans quick. Also, they aren’t usually sold into, they are rarely asked their opinion, etc.
How to position within that market
Give them a voice. The same goes for any lower level positions as well by the way. When people are getting started in their careers they are looking to hear about the jobs people have even at the lower levels but the resources just aren’t there. Even for more senior roles, it’s hard to get a beat on what the current status is of their projects, people don’t like sharing - I still don’t know why.
We’re seeing communities around Sales popup SalesHacker, sales, Bravado etc. We don’t see as many for other roles, there is a wide open space in this. I don’t see any places for people to better understand customer support/success which is THE ONLY INBOUND TOUCHPOINT WITH CUSTOMERS POST SALE.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
This is part of the philosophy and psychology of understanding human dynamics. Find a persona that you can relate to immediately and build your product around fixing their problems, be obsessed with this.
They get paid nothing, but they’d like less tickets, how do you reduce that ticket count, how do you bring other parts of the business that they may need to have access to more prominently in your support system so they don’t have to have multiple windows open. How do you build something to maximize their efficiency?
Better yet, how do you tag someone in the CRM and flag it over to the sales system to see if they purchase more product as a result of a good interaction with support - this is how you turn a cost center into a revenue generator. This is a killer feature that I’m not aware of out of the box.
This could unlock a commission structure and reward system for what is arguably becoming a dealbreaker for most companies.
Which is a great segway to the next drill down - you should be starting to see how this all really blends together if done correctly.
LEVEL 8: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation that have less than 100 skus and do less than $10 million in annual revenue with support teams less than 5 people who are looking to automate their processes.
How to niche down
They have to be looking to automate their process or improve their workflow. When people find a tech stack that works, oftentimes new technology doesn’t stick around very long, we’re all creatures of habit.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
You’re only looking for people that are talking about processes or a company that has something related to the pride they take with their process - you can check out BuiltWith and see a list of products they have tried over the last 18 months.
When a company is testing a bunch of different products it means they are looking for a better process. This is your sweet spot.
How to position within that market
You’ve seen me sprinkle “workflow” into this post. This is pretty much a preview of Part 3 and the importance of product design.
Your product must improve someone’s existing workflow. If it doesn’t it’s not a viable product.
There are two parts to this, does your product improve an existing workflow AND how easy can your product be inserted into that workflow?
Remember, this is their business and they need to make a transition as smoothly as possible with as little disruption as possible. This goes for any product you’re selling. Change is hard.
Understanding a company’s process really is everything.
If people aren’t looking to automate or improve their process, there’s a good chance you should change your approach immediately and work towards more of an education campaign and double down on what it would take to let people quickly switch over from an existing platform. Focus on reducing friction.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
Looking for people that are interested, not those we need to educate early on.
Data migration and implementation is one of the main reasons people don’t want to switch or entertain new products. There is always a fear of lost productivity.
Everyone is looking to automate right now, but the price has to be right, and that includes not the subscription amount, but the training, the migration, the new workflows, the time to adopt, the willingness to adopt, etc.
During almost any transition, the company will be paying for two systems at the same time during that handoff. This is rough, not enough companies actually address this in a meaningful way.
The argument is that a pure SaaS play doesn’t exist or shouldn’t exist for an early stage company, there should always be a service and consulting component. Hold everyone’s hand, understand their problems and make them feel like you’re building a product just for them.
Ok we’re almost there -
LEVEL 9: We’re a helpdesk product for eCommerce companies using Shopify and Shipstation that have less than 100 skus and do less than $10 million in annual revenue with support teams less than 5 people who are looking to automate their processes who are currently using Zendesk.
How to niche down
Let’s spearfish.
Zendesk - great platform - but has its limits that only show up based on workflows. Zendesk will work great until you have a workflow that incorporates other tools - then it starts to struggle.
This is true of most large legacy platforms. As legacy platforms moved up market to Enterprise for revenue reasons, they usually forget about smaller teams. Instead relying on dev house partners to do customizations.
This is where industry experience really comes into play - knowing the goals of a company or team, their workflows, and where you can create a better solution for those with those workflows for things that the legacy platforms prefer to source out to their dev house partners.
How to use this to target a market and recognize opportunity
Your calls can now go from generic to focused with questions that can hone in on workflows and gaps. For example, Zendesk’s UX/UI sucks for partner integrations, we’ve seen companies like Kustomer, Gorgias, and others become more popular because of a better UX/UI that supports the whole customer experience and journey. This is a fundamental switch in approach.
From one of our earlier research steps we found 87 companies that people were using for support with shopify, we have them in a spreadsheet, we then could take those and put all the competitors in builtwith to run some reports to understand market penetration (you can do this with number of reviews as well by the way if you’re lazy - don’t be lazy).
Download your list - populate your CRM - you now know what people are using, how long they’ve been using them.
Narrow down your list to the top 20 clients - yes only 20.
Even if you have 100 clients or a thousand clients at this point, this process works for every single Sales rep you have - and I’m going on a 95% chance none of them are doing this stuff. And if you tell me they are, I know from the amount of generic ass emails I get regularly spewed out to me they aren’t doing it well and I guarantee you money is being left on the table. (Topic for another day)
How to position within that market
You know what software they are using, you know their tech stack, your goal is to figure out their workflow. If you don’t know, ask. You should understand the general business workflows for the industry - again industry knowledge is required.
Engage them with conversation and find out. Base your questions on conversations you’ve had with other people in the space and be a source of information about how other people are doing it.
The above is completely able to be put into a human measurable process, one based on quality over quantity, relationships over transactions, and geared towards long term growth.
Be about the things that other platforms are not. Focus on changing the narrative from cost center to revenue generator.
The helpdesk for Shopify and Shipstation customers looking to streamline their processes and free up their support teams to become revenue generators in an organic and measurable fashion.
How to give yourself the biggest chance of success
It’s all about workflows, data, and automation.
Niche down, learn from the inside out, follow the trends and work on being able to tie back data to creating more revenue no matter what your product does and you’ll be able to start conversations with people actively looking to create more optimized workflows.
Focusing on a legacy product and small businesses usually allows you to find a sweet spot, they don’t find value in all the features because they won’t use them all. But they do want the more advanced features like automation and workflow help. These are usually cost prohibitive in the platform.
This is why you focus on workflow over features, you’ll never catch up with the big guys in terms of features, but there are always ways to compete on workflows, because everyone has their own independent goals around them. There aren’t standards, only best practices.
Side note - there are entire companies that are hired to implement systems like Zendesk and build integrations on top of it and it’s a market leader. The same goes for any market leader.
LEVEL 10ish: You can add location to the end of our narrowing down. A company physically local to you (at least this was the case prior to COVID-19) can allow for an in person visit which has been massive in building trust with early clients. Makes it easier to have a conversation as well.
That’s it. Go through this process, substitute your values, keep drilling down and recognize opportunity along the way. When you do it correctly you’ll see massive improvements for your initial outreach.
Emails go from:
We’re a new helpdesk company.
To:
We’re a new helpdesk company for customers that use Shopify and Shipstation. We help agile support teams that are looking to better automate their workflows. Our integrations also allows your support team’s interactions to be directly tied into future revenue generation.
___________
I can tell you from experience I’m visiting the url for the second email even if I’m not looking to make a change.
This is a good place to stop, we hit question 2 of 5 and we’re almost at the halfway point.
If you have more specific questions about this part just drop them in the comments and I'll respond to them.
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[Month 0] Growing An Informational Intent Site To $10,000 A Month From Scratch!

Although I have been wanting to start a new informational intent-based domain for a while now, I was planning to wait until 2021 to start it but due to the new round of commission changes in the Amazon Affiliate program, I have decided to put all of my Amazon projects on hold for now as I am massively overexposed to Amazon right now. Although I managed to earn almost $3600 last month from my money site network, the vast majority of it was from the Amazon Affiliate program.
Thankfully, I only had one small site hit by this latest round of changes with it taking about a 60% hit in commissions. My other two main domains are predominantly in the “All Other Categories” section and held at a 4% commission rate. That said though, I definitely think that there will be additional cuts and changes to the Amazon affiliate program in a few years so I want to get this informational intent domain off the ground as soon as possible.
My goal is to diversify both income and traffic sources with this new domain to help reduce future risk too as I have had a number of domains slapped by Google updates in the past. It will hopefully be making most of its money from display ad networks supplemented with a number of different affiliate programs with its traffic predominantly coming from organic search traffic supplemented by Pinterest and eventually Quora with any luck.
The majority of the content I am publishing right now is based around high search volume, low competition informational intent searches to try and scale the traffic on the domain as fast as possible to be able to apply to the Mediavine ad network. After that, I will start adding more content that is more suited to Pinterest and Quora traffic generation.
Niche
Although I have chased the commissions in the past and made sites around niches I had zero interest in, over the last year or two I have gone for lower-income potential niches that I actually know more about and enjoy. So far this is working well for me as I have been able to churn out tons of content without having to put much research in as I know a large amount of the information already as my last three domains have been based around my hobbies.
Although this new domain is not based around a hobby, it is based around something where I know a number of the sub-niches that I plan to cover on the domain well. This should allow me to churn out a ton of content when I have time while also bringing on freelance writers when possible to help me scale this new project as quickly as possible to get it off the ground.
Although the niche of the domain is specific, it is very broad so I should not be running into any problems with running out of content to write about any time soon. This has been an issue for a domain that I made in 2018 as well as one in 2019 where they are hard to scale at their current stage due to having covered so much of the niche already. With this new domain, I should be able to scale it for years to come without much of an issue. Also, I don't give out the specific niche to any of my projects so don't plan to reveal the niche that this domain is in.
Starting With The End In Mind
Although I do plan to keep this new domain going for a few years yet and focus on growing it, I am trying to build the domain in a way where it should be quick and easy to sell once its traffic and income are high enough. This should give me a way to quickly sell the domain if I want in a few years without having any issues but time will tell. On the subject of selling sites, I may sell one of my Amazon Affiliate sites in a few months to fire up some cash to scale this new domain even quicker depending on how it is looking in a few months but so far I have $1000-$2000 a month for this new project for various tasks.
One of my friend's purchases sites to diversify her investing portfolio and I reached out to her for things she looks for in a potential new domain and this is what she came back with saying the first 6 are the main ones she will try to get in any potential new purchase:-
Hosting Theme CMS
Although I have been a big fan of Cloudways previously, the ease of use of Sitegounds has won me over so I have gone with Sitegrounds for this new domain as my host of choice. I have stuck with Namecheap as my domain registrar as I have used them for years and never had a problem with them to date and I like how you get free WhoIs protection with them too.
CMS wise, Wordpress was a no brainer due to having so much experience with the CMS from my other projects. The developer community behind Wordpress pretty much ensures that I always have a plugin or custom code that I can use to do anything I need with ease too.
Although I used to use Newspaper and Colormag as my go-to themes of choice, I have since moved over to Astra as it is so quick and easy to set up so I have gone with Astra as my theme of choice for this new domain too. Without the adsense code on the domain, it is giving me a page load time of around 0.6 seconds for a 2000 word article and around 2.5 seconds load time for the same page with the ad code on it.
This is the load times for a 2000 word article on the domain. The top left is Pingdom without having adsense code on the domain, the top right is Pingdom with adsense code on the domain and the bottom is GTMetrics with adsense code on the domain. GTMetrics were having issues on the day I set the domain up so I never managed to get a speed test before adding the adsense code with GTMetrics. The page sizes are different due to the compression from the autooptimize plugin covered below.
Plugins
AAWP
AAWP is a premium plugin that allows me to quickly and easily make product comparison table and link out to the items on Amazon. It also offers automatic geo-targeting for Amazon as well as a few other things but it does need access to the Amazon API so if you are brand new to this, the normal Amazon One Link system will probably be better and easier until you get your Amazon account approved and get access to their API calls.
If you are new to making affiliate blogs then I go over how you are able to make decent looking comparison tables here using free tools. If you don't have access to the API for Amazon or are on a budget for your blog then it might be worth checking out as you can make them look surprisingly good and they don't take too long to build.
Ads.txt Manager
Not a plugin that I usually use and there are a bunch that does the same thing but it basically allows me to quickly and easily edit my ads.txt file to add the different networks IDs to serve ads on my domain. As this new project is mainly going to be an informational content domain, display ads should make up a solid part of its income and I plan to switch ad networks as traffic grows so this should save me a little time in the future.
Autoptimize
One of my favorite free plugins and offers basic caching and lazy loading of images to help compress your pages and speed your pages up. It's very easy to set up and can help you improve your GTMetrix scores if you care about stuff like that while getting your page load times down. I actually purchased the WP Rocket plugin that is a premium plugin that does a similar job but refunded it and came back to Autoptimize as I personally had better results with it and its free.
Disable Comments
I’m not looking to build a community in the blog comments of this domain or attract bots/spammers so I just disable all comments on all posts with this plugin. Quick and easy and takes ten seconds to set up and can prevent a ton of heartache if you end up on some bot auto-accept bot list.
Google Analytics for WordPress by MonsterInsights
I use this to automatically inject the analytics tracking code for Google Analytics for my domains. Although it is easy enough to do it yourself and manually add it to your theme's header, you have to remember to re-add it every time you update your theme if you do it manually so I just use a plugin to keep things easy.
Google XML Sitemaps
I have seen mixed reports about sitemaps and if it's even worth using them anymore, I still do but it's mainly out of habit rather than knowing if Google still needs them or just crawls your domain. This plugin lets you quickly and easily build out a constant sitemap with a few seconds of adding it to your domain.
Insert Headers and Footers
Pretty sure you can use this to auto inject your Google Analytics code to your header if needed instead of Monster Insights but I have never tried it. I use it to inject the Google Adsense auto ads code to the header of my pages to show their display ads, quick and easy, and offers the same advantage of you not having to go back in and re-add it after each theme update.
Pretty Links
A few uses but the main thing that I use it for is to add place holder links as I publish my content to later turn into affiliate links on the back end once I get approved to different programs. Make sure that the TOS for any affiliate program you apply to actually allows you to do this, it's a grey area with Amazon and a few other networks so be aware of that. It also lets you quickly and easily flip your links from one network to another.
ShortPixel Image Optimizer
Another great tool although it is freemium but for the majority of bloggers, the 100 credits a month that you get for free should be more than enough. It basically compresses your images when you upload them and has one of the best compression systems going from what I can see. It can drastically reduce the size of your images without having much effect on the actual image quality. This means the don’t take as much space up on your hosting while needing less bandwidth to actually send on a page required letting your page load quicker too.
Ultimate Addons for Gutenberg
Made by the same team who make the Astra theme, solid plugin considering its free, basically ads some additional blocks for the Gutenberg editor in Wordpress to let you do a few other things with it.
WP Revisions Control
This lets you quickly and easily set a maximum number of revisions for each post to stop it clogging up your database on bigger sites. This plugin does have its negative sides as if you set it to only a small number of revisions then you may not be able to back up to an old version of the post if you make a mistake or something but I like it.
WP Word Count
Probably useless/nothing more than a vanity metric for most people but I use it to quickly and easily screenshot the total word count for my domains for YouTube videos/Forum/Reddit posts. Basically you click its tab and you can see the information like this as well as your monthly published content and a few other things.
Other Plugins
Although I am only using the plugins listed above for this domain I have this post going over these plugins in a little more detail as well as a few other plugins that I use for my other domains. If you are looking to set your first domain up then it might be worth checking out.
Keyword Research
I have my old keyword research method posted on Reddit but keep in mind, its three years old now and has not aged well to keep up with how modern Google works and serves its page results for a user search. It shares the same problems as the KGR method and my own personal method that I use has evolved a ton since then but if you are brand new then it might be worth checking out but I have no plans to publish a guide for my current keyword research method as its one of my best assets for moving forward.
As this domain is based around broad, informational content rather than laser-targeting buyer intent keywords like my affiliate projects, I have been having great results from the free version of answer the public due to using much broader initial terms when using the tool. It's well worth checking out as it's free and provided you are careful with your free credits, you can probably stick to the free plan to get a ton of keywords.
I am also using keyword sh*tter too as its an excellent free tool. Although I never logged the keyword source for this current project, I think that answer the public has probably produced more high search volume/low comp keywords for this new project than keyword sh*tter but when it comes to the lower search volume stuff, keyword sh*tter blows answer the public out of the water so try both out if you want to do this yourself.
I have seen so many people say that they want to outsource their keyword research and to date, I have not seen any services that actually offer good keywords. Although I made this going over a keyword research service from Fiverr, I have had similar results with other services charging much more for the keywords they sell you. In my experience, the people who are good at keyword research just outsource and article and use it for growing their own domains so don't be sucked in by flashy sales letters promising your high search volume, low competition keywords as in my experience they are far from it and a waste of money.
Content
Although I linked it earlier in the post, here is the launch content count for the domain. I basically spent two weeks or so churning out content for the project and leaving it in draft mode then published it all at once. I have nothing to back this up data wise or even a theory as to why I do it, I just prefer to have a big chunk of content on the domain when launching it.
I have chosen this parent niche as I know a few of the sub-niches within it pretty well so should be able to churn out a large amount of the content myself with ease. In addition to this, I am planning to bring a few freelance writers on to help me scale the project as quickly as possible to try and diversify my income sources between the Amazon Affiliate program and display ad networks as quickly as possible.
The majority of the articles on my other domains are usually between 1000 and 2500 words and I plan to do the same for this one. I will basically be looking at the first page of Google and checking the word counts of the keyword relevant pages already ranking and at least planning to match the word count of those pages. Different people have their own opinions on this but this will be my plan for word count moving forward.
If you are brand new to this type of thing then I think that for modern google, scaling into content is one of the best ways to get started and you should aim for something similar to what I cover in this screenshot. Although you will likely fail in a large number of the initial keywords that you target, it should put you on the right track to build out your own positive feedback loops as you move forward to improve your own keyword research and content creation methods.
Although I used to type my content directly into the Wordpress editor, I have been using the Surfer SEO content editor as it saves me a fair bit of time when prepping my articles and lets me build templates for the freelancer writers quickly and easily. Surfer SEO is far from essential for this though and I personally think that it is over prices for anyone who just uses it for its content editor. I managed to scale to $3500 a month with my current money site network without it so there's no need to run out and subscribe to it.
I have typed up millions of words of content over the years for various projects and I made this going over some of the main tips that I have picked up over the years. If you are new to blogging then this may be helpful, it’s not going to shave massive amounts of time off your content generation but every little helps and saving time on every article can quickly add up over the coming months as you churn your content out.
I also made this going over how you can easily optimize your images for your blog I would highly recommend people watch it as its one of the few things I really do wish I had known about years back. I got involved in this type of stuff back in 2013/2014 and only really started optimizing my images in January 2020 and it has managed to shave a bunch of time off my page load speeds and storage space requirements. Depending on where you source your images, it can potentially take your image file sizes from 4MB down to >100KB and takes about a minute to do per image if that. If you need sources to get images for your content that you are able to legally use then I made this going over the three main ways that I get free images for my content that may be helpful too.
Backlinks
Although I will be using backlinks for this domain, they are not essential if you are just starting and target keywords that are low enough competition. I got the project I cover here to around $350 a month without backlinks and the project I cover here to $800 a month before I started building backlinks for it. I will initially be focusing on guest posts, niche edits, and manual forum posts for this new project though, and may move into additional link type in the future with it all being outsourced via agencies.
I don’t give out recommendations for the backlinks services I use either as I was using one of the bigger services until a few months back when they tried to scam me by delivering a PBN link instead of the niche edit that I ordered that had a list price of over $300 if I remember rightly. Although it's not the main point of the video, I go over the various ways that you can check any links that you do choose to outsource in this video so you can at least double-check any links that you outsource for your own projects to see if they are just PBN links.
I know that some people like to wait a few months before they start to backlink their projects but I am planning to start backlinking right away as it worked so well for the domain that I started in August last year that made over $1700 last month. I basically use the guest posts and niche edits to pass link juice to help increase my domains strength and hopefully help my pages climb in the search results. Although the main reason for using the manual forum posts is to increase the referring domain count to my project and dilute the anchor text ratio, it does look like they can help for getting your pages to climb in the search results from some tests I did on the domain I started in August.
Also, just to be clear, these are not forum profile links where you make your profile on a niche related forum and just drop your link on your profile page for your account on the forum. These are links dropped in niche relevant threads that have a fair bit of content in the thread making them much easier to index and they tend to have a higher chance of being a do-follow link thank forum profile links too.
Budget
Current Budget Spend For The Project
As I am trying to scale this project as much as possible I am outsourcing a fair few of the tasks but this is not essential as I have typed up most of the content for my other projects myself with the two domains I mentioned above-having none/minimal link building too helping to keep their initial budget costs down. This thread on Reddit from a while back might be worth reading if you have a budget available for your project as it's from a guy asking for advice on how to spend his budget on his site. One of the users has deleted their account in the thread now though so you have to manually click on the + near the deleted account name to expand the full thread.
This video also goes over a number of different tools with the majority being free that I use to do various tasks for my money site network too. This can help you do a number of tasks without having to hike your budget spend up so it might be worth checking out too as it can keep your costs as low as possible.
submitted by shaun-m to juststart [link] [comments]

Case Study: Karagk's Affiliate Website - Month 10

Hello, so last year in August I've made a post saying that I'm starting a new affiliate website for the first time with no prior experience just reading from others and trying to copy whatever patterns from other successful affiliate websites.
I've also stated in my last post that I'll keep this subreddit updated on my journey with this website each month, but in the first months of the website, I didn't see any significant changes in the metrics to make each post worthwhile to read.
Here is a list with each platform and it's metrics:
My results so far are not the most impressive as most of you guys here, but I've also been lazy in some months and I know I could have done better.
Along the way, I've learned a lot of new things and I've wanted to share with you guys what I applied to my website so far.
  1. Website speed
a) Choosing a Fast Lightweight WordPress Theme
At first, when I started I jumped right in with the rest of the newbies to get the most customizable and visually appealing theme and I eventually decided on thrive themes where they provide both nice themes to use and their own page builder thrive architect with a bunch of other things that could be useful for people that do other types of marketing (email marketing, lead generation, etc.).
The sad truth about this theme and page builder is that over time when adding more posts, it will eventually slow down the website.
The page builder adds a lot of HTML tags into the post that will eventually have an impact on the page speed and at one point, it was noticeable enough for me to make a change.
I've purchased a new lightweight theme recently (last month) where it had barely any javascript, the HTML was clean and the CSS was all in one place and it was easier for me to control how my website looked like.
The only issue here is that you will need some basic understanding of HTML, CSS, and maybe a bit of javascript if you want to add some interactive stuff to the website.
b) Setting Up Your Site with Cloudflare (CDN)
A CDN allows for the quick transfer of assets needed for loading Internet content including HTML pages, javascript files, stylesheets, images, and videos which will greatly have a good impact on your website speed.
This will also help protect your website against some common malicious attacks like a DDOS attack.
The best part about this is that its free with only having paid services if you would like to boost your website.
c) Install plugins that'll increase speed
Plugins that I'm currently using:
  1. CAOS - places the tracking code in the footer, hosts analytics.js/gtag.js/ga.js locally, bypasses Ad Blockers in Stealth Mode, captures outbound links, and much more.
  2. a3 Lazy Load - adds lazyloading to several elements from your website
  3. Async JavaScript - gives you full control of which scripts to add an 'async' or 'defer' attribute to or to exclude to help increase the performance
  4. Enable Gzip Compression - offers the option to enable and disable Gzip compression on your website
  5. W3 Total Cache - takes care of the cache on your website
  6. WP Revisions Control - controls how many revisions are stored for each post type
d) Load fonts locally
e) Enable Minification on HTML, CSS, and JS which can be done with a plugin
f) Optimize images
g) Use a VPS service
Applying all of the above made my website fast enough to get a score on google insights of 97 on mobile and 100 on desktop.
  1. Keyword research
I've used several keyword researching tools like SEMrush, ahrefs, and mangools but to be honest the most effective way for me at least is to use the google autocomplete suggestion, people also ask and searches related to the keyword at the bottom of the google page.
It makes me realize easier what's my competition for the specific keyword and if I can beat it.
So basically I'm looking to see how many searches per month the keyword gets, if I can beat the competition and if it relates in any way to my other posts to make it as relevant as possible to cover every aspect of my niche.
As for now, I've only targeted keywords that start with best/top with no informational posts, but only recently I've started to pick each money post and add more informational articles that are related to them.
  1. Backlinks
To be honest, here, I haven't done much at all.
I'm just hoping to get natural backlinks by having strong posts. Just recently I was looking into a backlink analysis tool and I've noticed that I've got a backlink from Reader's Digest on one of my most detailed articles. The article is one that I've put the most work on which is a best of type post. It made me quite happy and also boosted dramatically all my other posts to position 1 and snippets.
I'm curious to know about you guys how do you tackle this part since I know it can be quite boring to do this.
Goals for the next months:
  1. Continue to add enough content until I run out of keywords for the respective category so I can move on with the other categories
  2. While I wait for the writer to finish the requested articles, I will continue to update the existing ones with things that I think were missed and improve on-page SEO
  3. I will try my hand at Pinterest since I think my niche will do okay in that environment. Thinking of buying some creative pins from Fiverr for each of my posts and then try some wacky stuff to get as many followers as I can.
  4. I'm also interested in growing a Facebook page
  5. Trying to get 20,000 visits per month to apply for mediavine
I feel like I didn't cover all the things that I would have wanted to share but I'm hoping I will get to answer them in the comments.
submitted by Karagk to juststart [link] [comments]

Moore Reviews #3: Of Shadow and Sea by Will Wight book 1b of 6 in the Elder Empires companion trilogies. Spoiler-free

The review is posted here in its entirety, but can also be viewed on my goodreads here where you can immediately check out my many certified gif-free reviews. While my recent reviews are in-depth, many of my previous ones over the years have leaned more towards bite-sized. I also have a shelf of reviews I am most proud of. Lastly, for those that neither want to leave reddit, nor are aware of what this book is about, but think this review might convince you to read it, I've put the summary in the comments below. Now onto the review of one of my favorite indie novels!
Total Rating: 4.5 stars
World-building: 5 stars
Tone: 4.5 stars
Characters: 4.5 stars
Before I get into the review proper, I urge you to read Sea book 1 first. Both will by their very nature spoil some events of the other as their plots interweave, but this novel spoils a big reveal of Sea that we don't actually get to until book 2 of that trilogy, whereas the things Sea spoils for this novel tend to be much more minor. Now onto the good stuff.
There will inevitably be comparisons between this novel's companion book Of Sea and Shadow, but it starts with the biggest difference. Where Sea book 1 has a solid beginning, Shadow book 1 explodes into its story. We start with an excellent chapter 1, getting a character that is immediately well-defined in Shera. She wants to eat. She wants to sleep. And everything else is just something in the way of one of those two things, so she's made sure that she is good at dealing with things quickly and efficiently. And both her abilities, and her mentality are both immediately challenged in majorly gratifying ways. Psychopathy, to use as an umbrella term, is something that's going to crop up when you deal with assassins, but Shera is my favorite example of it, because the narration does not go out of its way to tell you that she is crazy, or to make her super edgy. You get her monologue. She does not care. She does not understand other people. She barely feels. She is ruled by her two desires, and the brilliance of this is making them two things that no human can do without: sleep and sustenance. This character that so few people will relate to psychologically, is immediately relatable in her two biggest motivations. Telling the story primarily from her POV also does something that Calder's POV did much less well: it enforces the tone. It is cold and efficient, and that is how the actions of the players in this world come across in this side of the story. Only in her friend Lucan do we get a counterpoint to that ideology, and it's done very earnestly.
The cast of Shadow feels smaller and more tight-nit, though I haven't sat down and actually compared the numbers. But where you are aware that there are many people on Calder's ship, and it feels like you're missing people when not every member is named, here you have the cell that Shera works with, three people and their commanding officer. It just feels more intimate in a book this size. I also found the characters a little more consistent in quality. Calder's merry band of weirdos feels a bit all over the place in comparison to this small team that were thrown together but all work to do the same job. I also just tend to prefer the chemistry of Shera, Meia, and Lucan to that of Calder and co.
One criticism I issued against Sea was that it was a bit lacking in themes, and that made it somewhat more hollow of a read. Shadow opens with a theme that it holds onto subtly throughout: what is the value of a life? We have the early death of a friend of Shera's as well as Shera's first kill, both posing that a life should be ended when it ceases being useful, and we have the Emperor whose longevity is seen as nearly as important as his power, and we see how his death upends the world, despite not having much evidence that he does much as an emperor. While this still isn't going to be a read that prides itself on being thought-provoking, it occasionally offers some nuggets to chew on for a moment.
In regards to world-builing, I mostly only have to echo what I said in my review of Sea, where I discussed how refreshing it was to get a fantasy world that had a Lovecraftian pantheon rather than a Greco-Roman style pantheon, and I appreciate the generally more grimdark feel of this world while still embracing magic and adventure.
My biggest criticism is that the flashback/flashforward nature of this novel didn't work as well as it's companion because there really wasn't enough to distinguish between the two after a point. They're both very subterfuge-heavy and Shera changed less with age than Calder did, so you couldn't really lean on that difference either. I listened via audiobook, and if I missed that a new chapter had started, sometimes it could take a bit too long to realize I was now eleven years in the past.
I have chosen to alternate sides of these companion trilogies, so I have already started book 2 of Sea "Of Dawn and Darkness."
BONUS Original review from 2017 Possibly the most creative world I've read of so far. I like the Lovecraftian feel to the powerful beings a lot and like the deviation from traditional Greek/Roman gods.
Where it really hooked me though: Shera. She just wants to sleep. I've never related more to a fantasy character. And it makes sense, because she does a lot to make herself tired.
I really liked the whole novel, though I will say the cliffhanger ->flashback ->resolution format it takes at times was frustrating in a bad way. There were a couple flashback scenes that just felt unnecessary, and they diffused the masterfully crafted tension of the previous chapter. But that's my only complaint. Incredibly excited both for the sequel and the opposite side of this novel.
Highly recommended to fans of Brandon Sanderson.
I'm going to link to the amazon pages of both this book as well as Of Sea and Shadow which while I don't like quite as much, I still recommend reading first. These are not affiliate links, I'm simply trying to remove a few of the clicks between you and two awesome books.
submitted by Nate_Moore to Fantasy [link] [comments]

[Case Study] Month 9 Insane Growth (58k to 276k sessions) and Goal Reached ($712/400)

Month 8
I'm back again with an insane update. Not only did I beat my original goals, but I've absolutely crushed them. Here's a general summary of what I did this month.

Stats


Stats Nov Dec Jan Feb* Mar Apr
Ad Revenue $226.45 $161 $128 $129 $347 $712
Organic Traffic (Sessions) 7,399 16,435 26,787 22,897 43,216 253,395
Users 19,056 15,589 22,715 19,628 49,934 204,098
Sessions 26,235 18,883 28,459 23,931 58,559 276,106
Sessions/User 1.34 1.21 1.25 1.22 1.17 1.35
Page Views 33,552 21,867 32,938 27,431 65,471 326,049
Pages/Session 1.28 1.16 1.16 1.15 1.12 1.18
Avg Session 0:57 0:41 0:39 0:39 0:33 0:48
Bounce Rate 86.12% 90.20% 90.61% 91.09% 92.27% 88.69%
*Missing a day and a half worth of analytics from February

My stats this month are insane compared to last month. Thanks to my extensive coverage of a new release at the start of the month, I was able to get thousands of users a day. My best day I saw 20k users! Sadly, I also saw a huge drop in RPM this month. Last month I was averaging about $7.73 per thousand and am not at a sad $3.92 with $2.50-3.50 being the average in the past few days. God if I was getting $7 per thousand I would've made close to $1400 this month. One can only dream. The recent drop in RPM is due to Covid and my change in themes. There was a significant noticeable drop at the start of the month and an even bigger drop after I changed themes. It's all expected and doesn't worry me. I'm hoping it'll all go up eventually.
With my 276k sessions, I qualify for Mediavine and Adthrive and have applied to both. I'm hoping they'll boost me back up if I get accepted.
While a ton of my traffic was mainly focused around one topic, almost all the other articles on my site have improved as well this month. I actually went back and looked at the analytics for each individual page and I'd say 60% are on an uphill trend, 30% have leveled off, 10% have either never taken off or gone downhill. Even the ones that went down still pull in views, just not as many as they used to. The majority of the articles I wrote this month have lost their hype but still pull in a good amount of views a day. I should average between 5k-7k a day for May if I don't upload anything new. It could be less though, time will tell. I'll, of course, be constantly pumping out new content so it should go up anyways.

Old Goals

Goals for May

submitted by JAnonW to juststart [link] [comments]

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submitted by Threw_it_to_ground to beermoney [link] [comments]

Great deals for 7/14, including Kwikset Smart Lock, WD 1TB SSD, iWriter, Hidden Folks

submitted by MarkDMill to MDMDeals [link] [comments]

MakerBeam megathread - building SFFPC using extrusions

MakerBeam megathread - building SFFPC using extrusions

one example of open frame made using MakerBeam extrusions
Greetings, Hope all of you are well. With so much free time some of you might think of building a SFFPC, so I made this post to share some information for those that are interested in building PCs using MakerBeam extrusions. This will be my reference guide for extrusion builds and will be kept up to date.
Why MakerBeam and not all the other possible extrusions like MakerBeamXL, OpenBeam or MicroRAX: MakerBeams are the only extrusions I know off that are of small dimensions (10mm) and have a hollow core that is threaded at both ends. MicroRAX which is also 10mm has a filled core and is mostly used for rail systems. The others are 15mm or larger in diameter, cost more and are more difficult to design projects for SFFPC's.
Why to choose extrusions instead of 3D printing, CNC machining or laser cutting: Extrusions are the cheapest option from the ones mentioned above because they don't require owning the machines, materials/filament and doing the manual handling and not many people have access to these tools.

Cons to building with MakerBeam:
- Expensive: Even tough they are less expensive than a custom prototyped case they are still to expensive considering something as versatile as SilverStone SG13 is £40. For example the Velka 5 design costs £40 without the required PCIe riser cable and the M1 design costs £65 when using corner cubes.
- Exposed components: If the frame is not covered with panels or mesh then there is a risk of damaging the components by outside factors like pets, children, sneezing or anything else really. There is no shielding so there might also be EM interference and coil whine depending on the parts used (I would not want to use my R9 Fury in one of these).
- Not pretty: While I am perfectly contempt with having every component exposed others might find it a bit barbaric. The SFFPC people love a minimalistic look and will sometimes make sacrifices just to have a perfect looking case.
- Rats nest wire management: If there are no panels covering the frame then the cables will be an eyesore. This can be solved with custom cables and combs.
- Dust: Dust is subjective and depends on the environment but having no dust filters means more dust. Personally I have less dust on my components since I moved to an open frame.
- Not portable: Unless fully protected in a hard case or covered with panels this will not be truly portable. The security personnel at the airport might raise an eyebrow.

Pros to building with MakerBeam:
- Ease of assembly: Assembling the extrusions and components is very easy compared to enclosed cases. All the sides are open for access and the assembly is similar to open bench tables.
- Fully modular: Can be configured in any way imaginable. Panels can be 3D printed, laser cut acrylic or metal, tempers glass or wood etc. Can have attachments like VESA mount/bracket to be mounted on or to hold a screen.
- Non-restrictive airflow: Components will stay cool and quiet because there are fewer barriers in front of the fans.
- Upgrade path: Can be upgraded based on needs as opposed to regular cases which will limit the upgrades you can make. Future components may require a new case.
- Flat packed: When disassembled the extrusions can fit in a thin bubble wrapped envelope or box and mailed. I think the Geeek cases come like this.
- Economic: Once a project is finished or upgraded the remaining extrusions and brackets ca be put to use elsewhere.

Disclaimer: I may sound as an MakerBeam evangelist but there is no financial benefit towards me for making these posts. I have no affiliation with MakerBeam and I buy all the parts just like everyone else. I am making these post to show there are other easy ways to build a custom PC case that doesn’t require access to power tools or machinery. This is a great starting point for those that want a custom case and don’t have access to these tools. My personal design goal was for the frame to have a small footprint on the desk and that is why most of my designs are vertical but there are many possible designs, from passively cooled to full water cooling loop, from STX to ATX, from VESA mounted to wall mounted.

Where to buy - worldwide official, worldwide resellers, UK, USA

3D files and CAD - Official MakerBeam CAD files
cnet.com - SketchUp Make (Freeware) easy to use tool for prototyping.
My design files in SketchUp format - .SKP format (2016 and up)
meccanismocomplesso.org - great article explaining T-slot framing.

Videos: youtube - MakerBeam official youtube channel.
youtube - short video of how to connect MakerBeams.
youtube - LTT building a PC with 2020 extrusions.
youtube - LTT review of an test bench made from extrusions.
youtube - custom Nvidia + Doom Eternal themed SFFPC.

Inspiration: These are great builds made by fellow redditors and others on the web.
makerbeam.com - the poster child of MakerBeam frame designs, passively cooled tower.
u/turkey_sausage - full size ATX tower, used for 2 years before making the post.
u/turkey_sausage - Cooler Master Elite 130 like design.
u/m_wizzard - mATX classic design with inverted motherboard.
u/suprmonky73 - basic APU design.
u/reTokyo - vertical air tunnel with 2x200mm fans.
u/postcopypaste - a clever mod made for a node 202.
u/NiceDepth - my first design, vertical with small footprint similar to Velka 5.
u/butter_milch - interesting take on the vertical design with IO facing down.
u/fuad_424 - work of art, 3x240 radiators in 18L excluding the fans.
u/BadBreath911 - vertical layout with 3D printed panels.
u/Cellbuster - STX motherboard with SFF GPU.
u/InnovativeAxis - interesting frame design using 3D printed parts.
u/NiceDepth - my second Velka 5 like design with no protrusions.
u/poblopuablo - video of classic design using 2020 extrusions.
u/saltyfunnel - stealthy Velka 5 like design using black extrusions
u/NiceDepth - my fourth design, classic M1 layout with 280 CLC.
u/Leinel1968 - NZXT H1 inspired design.
u/Ir0n_L0rd - sturdy vertical layout design.
mattxyz - failed MakerBeam attempt, good try though.
NiceDepth - vertical concept for ATX PSU.
Testifier - epic water cooled SLI tower.
Stevo_ - passive low power embedded motherboard.
u/80ishplus | update | final - great mod that's showing MakerBeam versatility and potential.
SFINGEMORTA - LZ7 inspired cube design.
KBZ - vertical tower design using 2020 extrusions and acrylic panels.
u/The_Psyko - silence focused 2 chamber design.
u/stand_up_g4m3r - full custom water cooled build in 10L.
u/Apple--Sauce - horizontal A4 style layout with 3.5'' HDD.
u/NiceDepth - horizontal layout great for custom water cooling
u/NiceDepth - vertical layout with three points of support and 280AIO cooler
u/NiceDepth | build guide - full mesh SFF tower using MakerBeam as the backbone.
u/greens14 - small footprint vertical layout with longer GPU support.
AURMEND - 5.4L console style layout with 3D printed panels.
u/krudsy - minimalistic open bench table layout.
u/NiceDepth - basic mITX bench table made from five extrusions.

Any suggestions to improve the post are welcomed.
submitted by NiceDepth to sffpc [link] [comments]

[Month 0] Growing An Informational Intent Site To $10,000 A Month From Scratch!

Note - Blogging is far from passive when initially getting the domain off the ground and setting everything up but the three established domains that I earn most of my income from have not been touched since January 2020, September 2019, and sometime in 2018 respectively so all the effort can pay off and lead to some solid delayed income that some people may call passive income.
Although I have been wanting to start a new informational intent-based domain for a while now, I was planning to wait until 2021 to start it but due to the new round of commission changes in the Amazon Affiliate program, I have decided to put all of my Amazon projects on hold for now as I am massively overexposed to Amazon right now. Although I managed to earn almost $3600 last month from my money site network, the vast majority of it was from the Amazon Affiliate program.
Thankfully, I only had one small site hit by this latest round of changes with it taking about a 60% hit in commissions. My other two main domains are predominantly in the “All Other Categories” section and held at a 4% commission rate. That said though, I definitely think that there will be additional cuts and changes to the Amazon affiliate program in a few years so I want to get this informational intent domain off the ground as soon as possible.
My goal is to diversify both income and traffic sources with this new domain to help reduce future risk too as I have had a number of domains slapped by Google updates in the past. It will hopefully be making most of its money from display ad networks supplemented with a number of different affiliate programs with its traffic predominantly coming from organic search traffic supplemented by Pinterest and eventually Quora with any luck.
The majority of the content I am publishing right now is based around high search volume, low competition informational intent searches to try and scale the traffic on the domain as fast as possible to be able to apply to the Mediavine ad network. After that, I will start adding more content that is more suited to Pinterest and Quora traffic generation.
Niche
Although I have chased the commissions in the past and made sites around niches I had zero interest in, over the last year or two I have gone for lower-income potential niches that I actually know more about and enjoy. So far this is working well for me as I have been able to churn out tons of content without having to put much research in as I know a large amount of the information already as my last three domains have been based around my hobbies.
Although this new domain is not based around a hobby, it is based around something where I know a number of the sub-niches that I plan to cover on the domain well. This should allow me to churn out a ton of content when I have time while also bringing on freelance writers when possible to help me scale this new project as quickly as possible to get it off the ground.
Although the niche of the domain is specific, it is very broad so I should not be running into any problems with running out of content to write about any time soon. This has been an issue for a domain that I made in 2018 as well as one in 2019 where they are hard to scale at their current stage due to having covered so much of the niche already. With this new domain, I should be able to scale it for years to come without much of an issue. Also, I don't give out the specific niche to any of my projects so don't plan to reveal the niche that this domain is in.
Starting With The End In Mind
Although I do plan to keep this new domain going for a few years yet and focus on growing it, I am trying to build the domain in a way where it should be quick and easy to sell once its traffic and income are high enough. This should give me a way to quickly sell the domain if I want in a few years without having any issues but time will tell. On the subject of selling sites, I may sell one of my Amazon Affiliate sites in a few months to fire up some cash to scale this new domain even quicker depending on how it is looking in a few months but so far I have $1000-$2000 a month for this new project for various tasks.
One of my friend's purchases sites to diversify her investing portfolio and I reached out to her for things she looks for in a potential new domain and this is what she came back with saying the first 6 are the main ones she will try to get in any potential new purchase:-
Hosting Theme CMS
Although I have been a big fan of Cloudways previously, the ease of use of Sitegounds has won me over so I have gone with Sitegrounds for this new domain as my host of choice. I have stuck with Namecheap as my domain registrar as I have used them for years and never had a problem with them to date and I like how you get free WhoIs protection with them too.
CMS wise, Wordpress was a no brainer due to having so much experience with the CMS from my other projects. The developer community behind Wordpress pretty much ensures that I always have a plugin or custom code that I can use to do anything I need with ease too.
Although I used to use Newspaper and Colormag as my go-to themes of choice, I have since moved over to Astra as it is so quick and easy to set up so I have gone with Astra as my theme of choice for this new domain too. Without the adsense code on the domain, it is giving me a page load time of around 0.6 seconds for a 2000 word article and around 2.5 seconds load time for the same page with the ad code on it.
This is the load times for a 2000 word article on the domain. The top left is Pingdom without having adsense code on the domain, the top right is Pingdom with adsense code on the domain and the bottom is GTMetrics with adsense code on the domain. GTMetrics were having issues on the day I set the domain up so I never managed to get a speed test before adding the adsense code with GTMetrics. The page sizes are different due to the compression from the autooptimize plugin covered below.
Plugins
AAWP
AAWP is a premium plugin that allows me to quickly and easily make product comparison table and link out to the items on Amazon. It also offers automatic geo-targeting for Amazon as well as a few other things but it does need access to the Amazon API so if you are brand new to this, the normal Amazon One Link system will probably be better and easier until you get your Amazon account approved and get access to their API calls.
If you are new to making affiliate blogs then I go over how you are able to make decent looking comparison tables here using free tools. If you don't have access to the API for Amazon or are on a budget for your blog then it might be worth checking out as you can make them look surprisingly good and they don't take too long to build.
Ads.txt Manager
Not a plugin that I usually use and there are a bunch that does the same thing but it basically allows me to quickly and easily edit my ads.txt file to add the different networks IDs to serve ads on my domain. As this new project is mainly going to be an informational content domain, display ads should make up a solid part of its income and I plan to switch ad networks as traffic grows so this should save me a little time in the future.
Autoptimize
One of my favorite free plugins and offers basic caching and lazy loading of images to help compress your pages and speed your pages up. It's very easy to set up and can help you improve your GTMetrix scores if you care about stuff like that while getting your page load times down. I actually purchased the WP Rocket plugin that is a premium plugin that does a similar job but refunded it and came back to Autoptimize as I personally had better results with it and its free.
Disable Comments
I’m not looking to build a community in the blog comments of this domain or attract bots/spammers so I just disable all comments on all posts with this plugin. Quick and easy and takes ten seconds to set up and can prevent a ton of heartache if you end up on some bot auto-accept bot list.
Google Analytics for WordPress by MonsterInsights
I use this to automatically inject the analytics tracking code for Google Analytics for my domains. Although it is easy enough to do it yourself and manually add it to your theme's header, you have to remember to re-add it every time you update your theme if you do it manually so I just use a plugin to keep things easy.
Google XML Sitemaps
I have seen mixed reports about sitemaps and if it's even worth using them anymore, I still do but it's mainly out of habit rather than knowing if Google still needs them or just crawls your domain. This plugin lets you quickly and easily build out a constant sitemap with a few seconds of adding it to your domain.
Insert Headers and Footers
Pretty sure you can use this to auto inject your Google Analytics code to your header if needed instead of Monster Insights but I have never tried it. I use it to inject the Google Adsense auto ads code to the header of my pages to show their display ads, quick and easy, and offers the same advantage of you not having to go back in and re-add it after each theme update.
Pretty Links
A few uses but the main thing that I use it for is to add place holder links as I publish my content to later turn into affiliate links on the back end once I get approved to different programs. Make sure that the TOS for any affiliate program you apply to actually allows you to do this, it's a grey area with Amazon and a few other networks so be aware of that. It also lets you quickly and easily flip your links from one network to another.
ShortPixel Image Optimizer
Another great tool although it is freemium but for the majority of bloggers, the 100 credits a month that you get for free should be more than enough. It basically compresses your images when you upload them and has one of the best compression systems going from what I can see. It can drastically reduce the size of your images without having much effect on the actual image quality. This means the don’t take as much space up on your hosting while needing less bandwidth to actually send on a page required letting your page load quicker too.
Ultimate Addons for Gutenberg
Made by the same team who make the Astra theme, solid plugin considering its free, basically ads some additional blocks for the Gutenberg editor in Wordpress to let you do a few other things with it.
WP Revisions Control
This lets you quickly and easily set a maximum number of revisions for each post to stop it clogging up your database on bigger sites. This plugin does have its negative sides as if you set it to only a small number of revisions then you may not be able to back up to an old version of the post if you make a mistake or something but I like it.
WP Word Count
Probably useless/nothing more than a vanity metric for most people but I use it to quickly and easily screenshot the total word count for my domains for YouTube videos/Forum/Reddit posts. Basically you click its tab and you can see the information like this as well as your monthly published content and a few other things.
Other Plugins
Although I am only using the plugins listed above for this domain I have this post going over these plugins in a little more detail as well as a few other plugins that I use for my other domains. If you are looking to set your first domain up then it might be worth checking out.
Keyword Research
I have my old keyword research method posted on Reddit but keep in mind, its three years old now and has not aged well to keep up with how modern Google works and serves its page results for a user search. It shares the same problems as the KGR method and my own personal method that I use has evolved a ton since then but if you are brand new then it might be worth checking out but I have no plans to publish a guide for my current keyword research method as its one of my best assets for moving forward.
As this domain is based around broad, informational content rather than laser-targeting buyer intent keywords like my affiliate projects, I have been having great results from the free version of answer the public due to using much broader initial terms when using the tool. It's well worth checking out as it's free and provided you are careful with your free credits, you can probably stick to the free plan to get a ton of keywords.
I am also using keyword sh*tter too as its an excellent free tool. Although I never logged the keyword source for this current project, I think that answer the public has probably produced more high search volume/low comp keywords for this new project than keyword sh*tter but when it comes to the lower search volume stuff, keyword sh*tter blows answer the public out of the water so try both out if you want to do this yourself.
I have seen so many people say that they want to outsource their keyword research and to date, I have not seen any services that actually offer good keywords. Although I made this going over a keyword research service from Fiverr, I have had similar results with other services charging much more for the keywords they sell you. In my experience, the people who are good at keyword research just outsource and article and use it for growing their own domains so don't be sucked in by flashy sales letters promising your high search volume, low competition keywords as in my experience they are far from it and a waste of money.
Content
Although I linked it earlier in the post, here is the launch content count for the domain. I basically spent two weeks or so churning out content for the project and leaving it in draft mode then published it all at once. I have nothing to back this up data wise or even a theory as to why I do it, I just prefer to have a big chunk of content on the domain when launching it.
I have chosen this parent niche as I know a few of the sub-niches within it pretty well so should be able to churn out a large amount of the content myself with ease. In addition to this, I am planning to bring a few freelance writers on to help me scale the project as quickly as possible to try and diversify my income sources between the Amazon Affiliate program and display ad networks as quickly as possible.
The majority of the articles on my other domains are usually between 1000 and 2500 words and I plan to do the same for this one. I will basically be looking at the first page of Google and checking the word counts of the keyword relevant pages already ranking and at least planning to match the word count of those pages. Different people have their own opinions on this but this will be my plan for word count moving forward.
If you are brand new to this type of thing then I think that for modern google, scaling into content is one of the best ways to get started and you should aim for something similar to what I cover in this screenshot. Although you will likely fail in a large number of the initial keywords that you target, it should put you on the right track to build out your own positive feedback loops as you move forward to improve your own keyword research and content creation methods.
Although I used to type my content directly into the Wordpress editor, I have been using the Surfer SEO content editor as it saves me a fair bit of time when prepping my articles and lets me build templates for the freelancer writers quickly and easily. Surfer SEO is far from essential for this though and I personally think that it is over prices for anyone who just uses it for its content editor. I managed to scale to $3500 a month with my current money site network without it so there's no need to run out and subscribe to it.
I have typed up millions of words of content over the years for various projects and I made this going over some of the main tips that I have picked up over the years. If you are new to blogging then this may be helpful, it’s not going to shave massive amounts of time off your content generation but every little helps and saving time on every article can quickly add up over the coming months as you churn your content out.
I also made this going over how you can easily optimize your images for your blog I would highly recommend people watch it as its one of the few things I really do wish I had known about years back. I got involved in this type of stuff back in 2013/2014 and only really started optimizing my images in January 2020 and it has managed to shave a bunch of time off my page load speeds and storage space requirements. Depending on where you source your images, it can potentially take your image file sizes from 4MB down to >100KB and takes about a minute to do per image if that. If you need sources to get images for your content that you are able to legally use then I made this going over the three main ways that I get free images for my content that may be helpful too.
Backlinks
Although I will be using backlinks for this domain, they are not essential if you are just starting and target keywords that are low enough competition. I got the project I cover here to around $350 a month without backlinks and the project I cover here to $800 a month before I started building backlinks for it. I will initially be focusing on guest posts, niche edits, and manual forum posts for this new project though, and may move into additional link type in the future with it all being outsourced via agencies.
I don’t give out recommendations for the backlinks services I use either as I was using one of the bigger services until a few months back when they tried to scam me by delivering a PBN link instead of the niche edit that I ordered that had a list price of over $300 if I remember rightly. Although it's not the main point of the video, I go over the various ways that you can check any links that you do choose to outsource in this video so you can at least double-check any links that you outsource for your own projects to see if they are just PBN links.
I know that some people like to wait a few months before they start to backlink their projects but I am planning to start backlinking right away as it worked so well for the domain that I started in August last year that made over $1700 last month. I basically use the guest posts and niche edits to pass link juice to help increase my domains strength and hopefully help my pages climb in the search results. Although the main reason for using the manual forum posts is to increase the referring domain count to my project and dilute the anchor text ratio, it does look like they can help for getting your pages to climb in the search results from some tests I did on the domain I started in August.
Also, just to be clear, these are not forum profile links where you make your profile on a niche related forum and just drop your link on your profile page for your account on the forum. These are links dropped in niche relevant threads that have a fair bit of content in the thread making them much easier to index and they tend to have a higher chance of being a do-follow link thank forum profile links too.
Budget
Current Budget Spend For The Project
As I am trying to scale this project as much as possible I am outsourcing a fair few of the tasks but this is not essential as I have typed up most of the content for my other projects myself with the two domains I mentioned above-having none/minimal link building too helping to keep their initial budget costs down. This thread on Reddit from a while back might be worth reading if you have a budget available for your project as it's from a guy asking for advice on how to spend his budget on his site. One of the users has deleted their account in the thread now though so you have to manually click on the + near the deleted account name to expand the full thread.
This video also goes over a number of different tools with the majority being free that I use to do various tasks for my money site network too. This can help you do a number of tasks without having to hike your budget spend up so it might be worth checking out too as it can keep your costs as low as possible.
submitted by shaun-m to passive_income [link] [comments]

[Month 0] Growing An Informational Intent Site To $10,000 A Month From Scratch!

Although I have been wanting to start a new informational intent-based domain for a while now, I was planning to wait until 2021 to start it but due to the new round of commission changes in the Amazon Affiliate program, I have decided to put all of my Amazon projects on hold for now as I am massively overexposed to Amazon right now. Although I managed to earn almost $3600 last month from my money site network, the vast majority of it was from the Amazon Affiliate program.
Thankfully, I only had one small site hit by this latest round of changes with it taking about a 60% hit in commissions. My other two main domains are predominantly in the “All Other Categories” section and held at a 4% commission rate. That said though, I definitely think that there will be additional cuts and changes to the Amazon affiliate program in a few years so I want to get this informational intent domain off the ground as soon as possible.
My goal is to diversify both income and traffic sources with this new domain to help reduce future risk too as I have had a number of domains slapped by Google updates in the past. It will hopefully be making most of its money from display ad networks supplemented with a number of different affiliate programs with its traffic predominantly coming from organic search traffic supplemented by Pinterest and eventually Quora with any luck.
The majority of the content I am publishing right now is based around high search volume, low competition informational intent searches to try and scale the traffic on the domain as fast as possible to be able to apply to the Mediavine ad network. After that, I will start adding more content that is more suited to Pinterest and Quora traffic generation.
Niche
Although I have chased the commissions in the past and made sites around niches I had zero interest in, over the last year or two I have gone for lower-income potential niches that I actually know more about and enjoy. So far this is working well for me as I have been able to churn out tons of content without having to put much research in as I know a large amount of the information already as my last three domains have been based around my hobbies.
Although this new domain is not based around a hobby, it is based around something where I know a number of the sub-niches that I plan to cover on the domain well. This should allow me to churn out a ton of content when I have time while also bringing on freelance writers when possible to help me scale this new project as quickly as possible to get it off the ground.
Although the niche of the domain is specific, it is very broad so I should not be running into any problems with running out of content to write about any time soon. This has been an issue for a domain that I made in 2018 as well as one in 2019 where they are hard to scale at their current stage due to having covered so much of the niche already. With this new domain, I should be able to scale it for years to come without much of an issue. Also, I don't give out the specific niche to any of my projects so don't plan to reveal the niche that this domain is in.
Starting With The End In Mind
Although I do plan to keep this new domain going for a few years yet and focus on growing it, I am trying to build the domain in a way where it should be quick and easy to sell once its traffic and income are high enough. This should give me a way to quickly sell the domain if I want in a few years without having any issues but time will tell. On the subject of selling sites, I may sell one of my Amazon Affiliate sites in a few months to fire up some cash to scale this new domain even quicker depending on how it is looking in a few months but so far I have $1000-$2000 a month for this new project for various tasks.
One of my friend's purchases sites to diversify her investing portfolio and I reached out to her for things she looks for in a potential new domain and this is what she came back with saying the first 6 are the main ones she will try to get in any potential new purchase:-
Hosting Theme CMS
Although I have been a big fan of Cloudways previously, the ease of use of Sitegounds has won me over so I have gone with Sitegrounds for this new domain as my host of choice. I have stuck with Namecheap as my domain registrar as I have used them for years and never had a problem with them to date and I like how you get free WhoIs protection with them too.
CMS wise, Wordpress was a no brainer due to having so much experience with the CMS from my other projects. The developer community behind Wordpress pretty much ensures that I always have a plugin or custom code that I can use to do anything I need with ease too.
Although I used to use Newspaper and Colormag as my go-to themes of choice, I have since moved over to Astra as it is so quick and easy to set up so I have gone with Astra as my theme of choice for this new domain too. Without the adsense code on the domain, it is giving me a page load time of around 0.6 seconds for a 2000 word article and around 2.5 seconds load time for the same page with the ad code on it.
This is the load times for a 2000 word article on the domain. The top left is Pingdom without having adsense code on the domain, the top right is Pingdom with adsense code on the domain and the bottom is GTMetrics with adsense code on the domain. GTMetrics were having issues on the day I set the domain up so I never managed to get a speed test before adding the adsense code with GTMetrics. The page sizes are different due to the compression from the autooptimize plugin covered below.
Plugins
AAWP
AAWP is a premium plugin that allows me to quickly and easily make product comparison table and link out to the items on Amazon. It also offers automatic geo-targeting for Amazon as well as a few other things but it does need access to the Amazon API so if you are brand new to this, the normal Amazon One Link system will probably be better and easier until you get your Amazon account approved and get access to their API calls.
If you are new to making affiliate blogs then I go over how you are able to make decent looking comparison tables here using free tools. If you don't have access to the API for Amazon or are on a budget for your blog then it might be worth checking out as you can make them look surprisingly good and they don't take too long to build.
Ads.txt Manager
Not a plugin that I usually use and there are a bunch that does the same thing but it basically allows me to quickly and easily edit my ads.txt file to add the different networks IDs to serve ads on my domain. As this new project is mainly going to be an informational content domain, display ads should make up a solid part of its income and I plan to switch ad networks as traffic grows so this should save me a little time in the future.
Autoptimize
One of my favorite free plugins and offers basic caching and lazy loading of images to help compress your pages and speed your pages up. It's very easy to set up and can help you improve your GTMetrix scores if you care about stuff like that while getting your page load times down. I actually purchased the WP Rocket plugin that is a premium plugin that does a similar job but refunded it and came back to Autoptimize as I personally had better results with it and its free.
Disable Comments
I’m not looking to build a community in the blog comments of this domain or attract bots/spammers so I just disable all comments on all posts with this plugin. Quick and easy and takes ten seconds to set up and can prevent a ton of heartache if you end up on some bot auto-accept bot list.
Google Analytics for WordPress by MonsterInsights
I use this to automatically inject the analytics tracking code for Google Analytics for my domains. Although it is easy enough to do it yourself and manually add it to your theme's header, you have to remember to re-add it every time you update your theme if you do it manually so I just use a plugin to keep things easy.
Google XML Sitemaps
I have seen mixed reports about sitemaps and if it's even worth using them anymore, I still do but it's mainly out of habit rather than knowing if Google still needs them or just crawls your domain. This plugin lets you quickly and easily build out a constant sitemap with a few seconds of adding it to your domain.
Insert Headers and Footers
Pretty sure you can use this to auto inject your Google Analytics code to your header if needed instead of Monster Insights but I have never tried it. I use it to inject the Google Adsense auto ads code to the header of my pages to show their display ads, quick and easy, and offers the same advantage of you not having to go back in and re-add it after each theme update.
Pretty Links
A few uses but the main thing that I use it for is to add place holder links as I publish my content to later turn into affiliate links on the back end once I get approved to different programs. Make sure that the TOS for any affiliate program you apply to actually allows you to do this, it's a grey area with Amazon and a few other networks so be aware of that. It also lets you quickly and easily flip your links from one network to another.
ShortPixel Image Optimizer
Another great tool although it is freemium but for the majority of bloggers, the 100 credits a month that you get for free should be more than enough. It basically compresses your images when you upload them and has one of the best compression systems going from what I can see. It can drastically reduce the size of your images without having much effect on the actual image quality. This means the don’t take as much space up on your hosting while needing less bandwidth to actually send on a page required letting your page load quicker too.
Ultimate Addons for Gutenberg
Made by the same team who make the Astra theme, solid plugin considering its free, basically ads some additional blocks for the Gutenberg editor in Wordpress to let you do a few other things with it.
WP Revisions Control
This lets you quickly and easily set a maximum number of revisions for each post to stop it clogging up your database on bigger sites. This plugin does have its negative sides as if you set it to only a small number of revisions then you may not be able to back up to an old version of the post if you make a mistake or something but I like it.
WP Word Count
Probably useless/nothing more than a vanity metric for most people but I use it to quickly and easily screenshot the total word count for my domains for YouTube videos/Forum/Reddit posts. Basically you click its tab and you can see the information like this as well as your monthly published content and a few other things.
Other Plugins
Although I am only using the plugins listed above for this domain I have this post going over these plugins in a little more detail as well as a few other plugins that I use for my other domains. If you are looking to set your first domain up then it might be worth checking out.
Keyword Research
I have my old keyword research method posted on Reddit but keep in mind, its three years old now and has not aged well to keep up with how modern Google works and serves its page results for a user search. It shares the same problems as the KGR method and my own personal method that I use has evolved a ton since then but if you are brand new then it might be worth checking out but I have no plans to publish a guide for my current keyword research method as its one of my best assets for moving forward.
As this domain is based around broad, informational content rather than laser-targeting buyer intent keywords like my affiliate projects, I have been having great results from the free version of answer the public due to using much broader initial terms when using the tool. It's well worth checking out as it's free and provided you are careful with your free credits, you can probably stick to the free plan to get a ton of keywords.
I am also using keyword sh*tter too as its an excellent free tool. Although I never logged the keyword source for this current project, I think that answer the public has probably produced more high search volume/low comp keywords for this new project than keyword sh*tter but when it comes to the lower search volume stuff, keyword sh*tter blows answer the public out of the water so try both out if you want to do this yourself.
I have seen so many people say that they want to outsource their keyword research and to date, I have not seen any services that actually offer good keywords. Although I made this going over a keyword research service from Fiverr, I have had similar results with other services charging much more for the keywords they sell you. In my experience, the people who are good at keyword research just outsource and article and use it for growing their own domains so don't be sucked in by flashy sales letters promising your high search volume, low competition keywords as in my experience they are far from it and a waste of money.
Content
Although I linked it earlier in the post, here is the launch content count for the domain. I basically spent two weeks or so churning out content for the project and leaving it in draft mode then published it all at once. I have nothing to back this up data wise or even a theory as to why I do it, I just prefer to have a big chunk of content on the domain when launching it.
I have chosen this parent niche as I know a few of the sub-niches within it pretty well so should be able to churn out a large amount of the content myself with ease. In addition to this, I am planning to bring a few freelance writers on to help me scale the project as quickly as possible to try and diversify my income sources between the Amazon Affiliate program and display ad networks as quickly as possible.
The majority of the articles on my other domains are usually between 1000 and 2500 words and I plan to do the same for this one. I will basically be looking at the first page of Google and checking the word counts of the keyword relevant pages already ranking and at least planning to match the word count of those pages. Different people have their own opinions on this but this will be my plan for word count moving forward.
If you are brand new to this type of thing then I think that for modern google, scaling into content is one of the best ways to get started and you should aim for something similar to what I cover in this screenshot. Although you will likely fail in a large number of the initial keywords that you target, it should put you on the right track to build out your own positive feedback loops as you move forward to improve your own keyword research and content creation methods.
Although I used to type my content directly into the Wordpress editor, I have been using the Surfer SEO content editor as it saves me a fair bit of time when prepping my articles and lets me build templates for the freelancer writers quickly and easily. Surfer SEO is far from essential for this though and I personally think that it is over prices for anyone who just uses it for its content editor. I managed to scale to $3500 a month with my current money site network without it so there's no need to run out and subscribe to it.
I have typed up millions of words of content over the years for various projects and I made this going over some of the main tips that I have picked up over the years. If you are new to blogging then this may be helpful, it’s not going to shave massive amounts of time off your content generation but every little helps and saving time on every article can quickly add up over the coming months as you churn your content out.
I also made this going over how you can easily optimize your images for your blog I would highly recommend people watch it as its one of the few things I really do wish I had known about years back. I got involved in this type of stuff back in 2013/2014 and only really started optimizing my images in January 2020 and it has managed to shave a bunch of time off my page load speeds and storage space requirements. Depending on where you source your images, it can potentially take your image file sizes from 4MB down to >100KB and takes about a minute to do per image if that. If you need sources to get images for your content that you are able to legally use then I made this going over the three main ways that I get free images for my content that may be helpful too.
Backlinks
Although I will be using backlinks for this domain, they are not essential if you are just starting and target keywords that are low enough competition. I got the project I cover here to around $350 a month without backlinks and the project I cover here to $800 a month before I started building backlinks for it. I will initially be focusing on guest posts, niche edits, and manual forum posts for this new project though, and may move into additional link type in the future with it all being outsourced via agencies.
I don’t give out recommendations for the backlinks services I use either as I was using one of the bigger services until a few months back when they tried to scam me by delivering a PBN link instead of the niche edit that I ordered that had a list price of over $300 if I remember rightly. Although it's not the main point of the video, I go over the various ways that you can check any links that you do choose to outsource in this video so you can at least double-check any links that you outsource for your own projects to see if they are just PBN links.
I know that some people like to wait a few months before they start to backlink their projects but I am planning to start backlinking right away as it worked so well for the domain that I started in August last year that made over $1700 last month. I basically use the guest posts and niche edits to pass link juice to help increase my domains strength and hopefully help my pages climb in the search results. Although the main reason for using the manual forum posts is to increase the referring domain count to my project and dilute the anchor text ratio, it does look like they can help for getting your pages to climb in the search results from some tests I did on the domain I started in August.
Also, just to be clear, these are not forum profile links where you make your profile on a niche related forum and just drop your link on your profile page for your account on the forum. These are links dropped in niche relevant threads that have a fair bit of content in the thread making them much easier to index and they tend to have a higher chance of being a do-follow link thank forum profile links too.
Budget
Current Budget Spend For The Project
As I am trying to scale this project as much as possible I am outsourcing a fair few of the tasks but this is not essential as I have typed up most of the content for my other projects myself with the two domains I mentioned above-having none/minimal link building too helping to keep their initial budget costs down. This thread on Reddit from a while back might be worth reading if you have a budget available for your project as it's from a guy asking for advice on how to spend his budget on his site. One of the users has deleted their account in the thread now though so you have to manually click on the + near the deleted account name to expand the full thread.
This video also goes over a number of different tools with the majority being free that I use to do various tasks for my money site network too. This can help you do a number of tasks without having to hike your budget spend up so it might be worth checking out too as it can keep your costs as low as possible.
submitted by shaun-m to Blogging [link] [comments]

Affiliate Marketingly is a free affiliate theme from ThemeEverest. Even though I never recommend free themes because of tons of issues including support, the theme sets it apart from the crowd. If you are just starting your Amazon affiliate website and currently in the experimentation phase, using a free theme doesn’t hurt. Gutenshop is a free ecommerce theme for WordPress that can be used to promote products via the Amazon affiliate scheme. Thanks to the library of layouts and templates in the Gutenshop package, you can display products and the other items you are promoting on your site in a range of different formats. 16 Free Amazon Affiliate Plugins. The compilation will be of interest to everyone who is an Amazon affiliate or just plans to become one, and gives preference to WordPress CMS. All of the tools that are listed below receive frequent system updates and are compatible with the latest WordPress versions. EasyAzon Re Think is a great theme that is helpful to setup Amazon based affiliate networks. It has a complete package of whatever the user needs for designing the website. It has a review system along with displaying products. The review doesn’t mean the plan review, but the factors that determine the good and bad of the product will be explained in Feel free to comments below if you have any question about those themes so that we can help you to choose the best Amazon affiliate WordPress theme free. Tweet. Share 101. Pin. 101 Shares. Editorial Staff. Hey, I'm Mariana. Full-time blogger and editorial staff on this GoodlyWp review website. You will find Various type of helpful review

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